21 March 1960 - Sharpeville

May we never forget

Sharpeville 21 March 1960

It’s a long read, but this is the (to me) a turning point in South Africa’s history. This was the day that the ANC and PAC changed from peacefull orginisations to millitant ones…

300 people injured, only 30 shot from the front.
No weopons, just a peacefull protest.
The police thaught otherwise.


The day is remembered today as a national holiday : Human rights day.

Thank God for white South Africans like Byers Naude who saved some face for the white man in South Africa. Its because of people like him that black people know that not all of us white South African males are mindless prejudice racist pigs…

Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika - God bless Africa

Thank you, Wihan, that is most interesting. :)

I’ll try to read that at home Wihan. In the meantime… Godspeed to you and Africa.

TG

It's a long read, but this is the (to me) a turning point in South Africa's history. This was the day that the ANC and PAC changed from peacefull orginisations to millitant ones...
I haven't read the entire article but are you suggesting Gandhi was wrong?

Huh?

(I am suggesting that I don’t have a clue what Mike means, even in jest.)

Quote (Mr Soul @ Mar. 10 2005,17:53)
It's a long read, but this is the (to me) a turning point in South Africa's history. This was the day that the ANC and PAC changed from peacefull orginisations to millitant ones...

I haven't read the entire article but are you suggesting Gandhi was wrong?
No, I'm fairly certain that was not the intention, Mike.
No, I'm fairly certain that was not the intention, Mike.
Didn't the militant movement work better to eventually end apartheid?
Didn't the militant movement work better to eventually end apartheid?

I'm not sugesting Ghandi was wrong, and I'm not complaining about them becoming militant. I was just commenting on the day, and hoping that we never come to something like that again.

To me it was the day the real problems started.
Weeks after that a law was passed to outlaw the ANC and the PAC, and from there they were forced to go underground.

Then the paw-paw really hit the fan as things became more violent and violent.

Back then the apartheid government should have started treating the black people with respect and like real people.
Then we would have had far less problems today with affirmative action and the like...



Deep Blue (sout hafrican band) summed it up in 1988 with their song 'Weeping'. They even slipped in the tune to 'Nkosi sikilel' onto the air with this song.


I knew a man who lived in fear
It was huge, it was angry, it was drawing near
Behind his house, a secret place
Was the shadow of the demon he could never face.

He built a wall of steel and flame
And men with guns, to keep it tame
Then standing back, he made it plain
That the nightmare would never ever rise again
But the fear and the fire and the guns remain.

It doesn't matter now
It's over anyhow
He tells the world that it's sleeping
But as the night came round
I heard its lonely sound
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping.

And then one day the neighbours came
They were curious to know about the smoke and flame
They stood around outside the wall
But of course there was nothing to be heard at all
"My friends", he said, "We've reached our goal
The threat is under firm control
As long as peace and order reign
I'll be damned if I can see a reason to explain
Why the fear and the fire and the guns remain."

It doesn't matter now
It's over anyhow
He tells the world that it's sleeping
But as the night came round
I heard its lonely sound
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping.
I'm not sugesting Ghandi was wrong, and I'm not complaining about them becoming militant. I was just commenting on the day, and hoping that we never come to something like that again.

I know you weren't - I was just adding some commentary (something I hated doing) :laugh:

Ah, ok !


W.

:)