any good come out of,,,,

using 2 soundcards,

is there an y reason to use to use 2 soundecards in the same machine? like one for record an other for playback?

Hi, People sometimes use two soundcards in order to get more simultaneous inputs, but unless you can "lock " their clocks togethet you get a drift between them.

Other people like me, have two soundcards an M-audio delta for audio recording duties and a cheapo sound blaster for Midi synth duties.

Nick

Yip - what Nick said.

You can link two SBLives together (some soldering/butchering required) to get more inputs.

The other reason you’d want to (maybe) have two cards is if you use one for recordong/playback, and the other one (like a SBLive) for it’s realtime effects processor.

But if it’s full duplex and you only need two stereo inputs and no extra midi, then it’s not needed.

W.

At best, I’ve had three soundcards on the same machine… (a SB 64V for audio recording/playback, TB Maui and SB AWE32 for midi playback). The system worked, but configuring things was a bit of a drag after every system install.

Actually, I’m having three soundcards in my computer right at the moment, too:

E-mu 1820. This is the eight channel audio recording/playback card. Some DSP capabilities, too. Haven’t used that part much. What I’ve tried, works mostly okay. Sometimes there’s some crackle and noises with the DSP effects I’ve not bothered to track down (so far). Otherwise, a nice card.
ESI GigaStation for midi playback. The reason to get this one was that I could get GigaStudio (2.54) cheaper with the card than without, and the price was much cheaper than any other soft sampler of this quality.
Universal Audio UAD-1 (Projekt Pak). This is solely a DSP accelerator card with no I/O, bought partly because of the plugins it came with (plus they have an offer to add a LA2A compressor if you register online before the end of September). Anyway, a great card for reducing the CPU load and great plugins, especially the compressors.

All this installed with only a little trouble: I needed to switch the GigaStation to another PCI slot to get it to work, after their support person’s suggestion. Then everything has worked just nicely. That said, all the cards were installed one at the time: I’ve yet to re-install the system so if there’ll be problems awaiting, I’m yet to experience them. Windows XP should need less frequent re-installations, though, than my old '98se/ME.

I use 2 soundcards linked together to give me 16 outs so I can do all my mixing on an analog desk. I’ve never liked mixing with a mouse or the digital control surfaces where you only control 8 faders at a time - I like the realtime volume,m panning, soloing, muting and EQ for each channel at my fingertips although I must admit I am using mostly plugin effects now (thanks to the “freeze” function). I find that, along with the ability to edit individual wave files where necessary, this gives me the best of both worlds. Your milage may vary of course.

Wow, Jeff – that seems like a huge step backwards to me. I like the fact that now I can mix a project and save it and load it back up and all the controls are set how I want 'em. And I can automate volume changes on a track and it happens every time automagically, rather than me having to ride the gain on each playback! The evils of the old analog days!

The better way to get controls at your fingertips is a MIDI control surface (unfortunately, not free though!) Note that to get quick response to the controls you need to also configure for low latency (e.g., use ASIO outputs, or else configure WDM buffering for low latency). This also avoids the loss of fidelity caused by reconverting every track to analog and the final mix back to digital (assuming you’re recording the results from the mixer).

I understand wanting the controls at your fingertips, though. The mouse as an audio control was NOT a step forward. :laugh:

Mwah -

How’s that UAD-1 treating you?

I’ve been looking for a way to move processor load off to something else. But I’m reticent to buy a unit that can only run their own proprietary plugins. Can you also load any old VSTs or something into it? Anyone know of something like that?

Is this a stupid question?

I remember seeing adds for this at KVR, fits the description but might be cheaper to just buy a better computer :)

http://www.museresearch.com/receptor_overview.php

Quote (Octopus @ Sep. 14 2005,06:16)
How’s that UAD-1 treating you?

UAD-1’s very nice, thank you :cool:

You’re right - you can load only UA’s plugins to the UAD-1’s memory (of course, you can use all of your other plugins the normal way). Happily, they’re pretty good, especially the compressors, the CS-1 Channel Strip and the Pultec EQ.

(Haven’t got into liking the Realverb Pro yet - maybe I should invest to the Plate 140 some day…)

One thing I noticed with the nTS: if you freeze a track, UAD-1’s control software still thinks the track plugins are active - so if you have the “limit CPU load” option checked, you get an error message if you try to load an extra plugin. Fortunately, all it needs is to uncheck the option and everything works fine.

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The mouse as an audio control was NOT a step forward.


Yep. The modern DAW’s savior when it comes to mixing is the development of the ability to DRAW envelopes. Trying to “mouse mix” in real-time is akin to driving blind-folded IMO.

TG

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Trying to “mouse mix” in real-time is akin to driving blind-folded IMO.


We have a TV motoring program here in the UK, called Top Gear. Each week they have a celebrity on the show and get them to drive their test circuit. The lap times are then compared and ranked with their counterparts from previous weeks.

One week, rather amazingly, they had a blind chap (Billy Baxter) who drove the circuit whilst being guided round by the host. (I’m not sure who was the braver!).

Anyway, his blind lap time was faster than some of the celebs. See here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/topgear/star_laps/

So maybe, just maybe mouse mixing is possible.

:slight_smile:


Mark
Quote (learjeff @ Sep. 14 2005,06:06)
Wow, Jeff -- that seems like a huge step backwards to me. I like the fact that now I can mix a project and save it and load it back up and all the controls are set how I want 'em. And I can automate volume changes on a track and it happens every time automagically, rather than me having to ride the gain on each playback! The evils of the old analog days!

The better way to get controls at your fingertips is a MIDI control surface (unfortunately, not free though!) Note that to get quick response to the controls you need to also configure for low latency (e.g., use ASIO outputs, or else configure WDM buffering for low latency). This also avoids the loss of fidelity caused by reconverting every track to analog and the final mix back to digital (assuming you're recording the results from the mixer).

I understand wanting the controls at your fingertips, though. The mouse as an audio control was NOT a step forward. :laugh:

Hi LearJeff,

I still think I have the "best of both worlds" in that I can still use volume automation when I want it (and generally for things like boosting levels for a solo etc. I do use it. Just because I *can* move the faders on the analog desk doesn't mean I *always* have to - I can adjust it on either place).

As for the quality - the loss of quality going from digital to analog and back again is really no more than you would get using, for example, an ADAT machine with an analog desk which is what many commercial studios were (and still are) using and most people were pretty happy with the sound quality of that. I also use plugins (via the freeze function)extensively, as I said, as well as virtual instruments.

My setup also gives true zero latency when overdubbing and the ability to easily monitor a wet signal (using analog effects with zero latency) whilst recording the dry one for later processing.

The problem with the digital desks (that I could afford!!!) is that none of them let you have 16 faders at the same time, each with their own 3 band EQ and pan control which I really like for setting up a mix. Yes, I lose the ability to take a snapshot of my desk but I can live without that in the same way as we used to live without automation in the "old days". Now the studio is at home , time doesn't equal money so I have a lot more of it to spare.

I believe that once you get to a certain level of quality it isn't so important to keep up with the latest in the same way that my 5Mp camera is hi res enough for great A4 prints which is all I need, and will still continue to do that even when 16Mp cameras are on the shelf.

I certainly wouyldn't rule out the possibility of going totally digital when the right desk arrives at the right price but for now I really love my setup.

It's interesting to hear the different ways people use the hardware and software and the reasons why though. Does anyone else use a setup like mine?

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My setup also gives true zero latency


Don’t forget the 1 msec per foot between speakers and ears! Since a well-set-up DAW can have a latency under 5 msec, the latency issue is moot.

I like being able to work on more than one song at a time without having to write down all the analog control settings.

But you’re right, the closest MIDI control desk to an analog one (that I know of) is the Mackie, which is $1000 for 8 channels and doesn’t actually have separate knobs for each function (pan, eq), just one knob and you push a button to select the function (which isn’t too bad).

Regardless, to each his own. If you really want to hear about other folks’ opinions or setups, you should start a new thread because we kinda hijacked this one.

Jeff

kinda?lol,but interesting reading anyways for us backwoods types,thanks gang