Bose L1 Cylindrical speaker

Anyone try or own one?

I’m thinking about trying one of these for a vocal PA. One review in Musicians Friends states the obvious, with the speaker behind you it’s going to be rather loud. Scott Dorsey of rec.audio.pro doesn’t recommend them for a band but says they work OK for acoustic acts.

Any one have any experience with one of these? Thanks.

Ain’t tried one meself… however, I am a confirmed Bose skeptic. Their stuff I have heard/used has not lived up to the hype. YMMV, etc…

D

I hear ya’ but this thing would be totally cool if I could use 1 to replace 2 mains, 2 monitors & a heavy power amp.

This is what Dorsey said:

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Boselike. Exaggerated at either end, Kind of processed and artificial sounding. But no horn honk, which is important. Vocals sound very processed, but not offensive.

Well, you know the Fiend does have a 45 day return policy…

D

I found a bunch of reviews on Harmony Central. Alot of reviewers were happy with it but I don’t think it’s what I want.

If I got one from MF, I’d have to play shipping back to them - correct?

Rent one from your local shop, perhaps?

I had a chance to hear them at the local Guitar Satan. Not the best context, but my impression was for small acts they are just the thing - e.g., an acoustic guitar or two and a singer. You guy do a lot of Neil Young, right? You need volume. Lots of air moving. But with the low end module thingie they did sound quite nice in the “live sound room” - you know, the room that’s between the drum room and the guitar amp room, so that you get to hear lots of people playing cheap guitars through horride solid state distortion on one side and whambambam on the other. :)

Bose… humph…

For years, Bose has been designing all sorts of direct/reflecting combination speakers in an effort to produce a more “lifelike” soundstage and “wider, nore accurate stereo image”. The really funny thing about Bose is that the only speakers they ever built that are decent “IMHO” are the 901s. The 901s use no tricky reflecting drivers but instead use an array of small, full range speakers to produce a “natural” sound. And personally, I think they are over priced and not all that great sounding.

The current “pole” PA is just the latest fad that Bose is trying to sell. I have not seen them or heard them (so take this with a big grain of salt) but I have researched their design and read some white papers on them. Drivers mounted firing on a vertical axis with reflecting surfaces sending the sound in a 360 degree pattern. Because there are no loud “hot spots” feedback is drastically lowered and the sound is clear in all directions. Can it get really loud? Possibly, but I don’t think you will see them at any large venue anytime soon. I think a decent mixer/amp combo and a couple of lightweight quality speakers are going to sound much better and the sound will be better controlled (you can aim the sound).

Just 2 cents worth of opinion.

Mike

I dunno, Mike, I know Bose markets using hype a lot, but these did sound good for not-so-loud applications.

But I’m with you, I’d still rather have something a bit more conventional.

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The current “pole” PA is just the latest fad that Bose is trying to sell.

You should read some of the reviews. Actually the L1, with the bass module, is quite well liked. It eliminates the need for monitors & mains, i.e., it acts as both. Plus it’s quite light & can be disassembled.

My issue is that I want to use it for both electric & acoustic applications. For electric applications, everyone says it’s just too loud (because the speaker is behind you).

However, I would still like to try one but the local GC is not going to have one.

It would be interesting to try. Let us know if you get to check one out MT. You can buy a lot of standard PA gear for what they want for those jobbies though… I guess that IS the main point of the thing. NOT having to buy, schlep around, setup, tear down etc… all that standard PA gear.

I went to a demo once of a Bose home entertainment system. They plop you down in this mini “theatre” type deal and you see these little 2 inch cubes on the walls… four of 'em if I remember right. Then they proceeded to deafen you. It DID sound pretty incredible but EVERYTHING sounds pretty incredible up to the ear drum bursting point. :( That said, a guy I know bought one of the darn things. He says it does indeed sound great at home. But only when cranked up. For normal TV movie watching, he says it irritates the crap out of him. He’d like his money back.

A local Southern Gospel group (blech… not my style) played at our church one night. They had four Bose 901’s for mains. They sounded excellent. Well as excellent as Southern Gospel CAN sound! :p

I’m just skeptical… it’s a neat concept and I would like to hear about it if you try one out Toke.

D

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…I guess that IS the main point of the thing. NOT having to buy, schlep around, setup, tear down etc… all that standard PA gear.

You got it! I already have a full PA system & I’m tired of lugging it around, particularly for acoustic gigs. I would sell all this stuff.

Toker, don’t be drawn in by the hype ans the propaganda. Sure, for an acoustic gig, in a rectangular room, that isn’t too big, and has no obstacles, nor any other areas that need to hear you, the pole system works just fine. Question is, how many times do you play in a room that is perfect for the pole? You want a simple system for playing acousticly (just you w/guitar singing)? Then get anyone of the millions of acoustic guitar amps that have a mic input and carry a small monitor speaker for better coverage.

But if you’d rather carry around 4 pieces of PA (the bottom main amp, two cylinders and a bass module) and spend $2000 in the process, help yourself.

By the way, check out how Bose describes the PAS specs:

"Spectral range: D below E string on the bass guitar, and above

Output: rock concert levels can be achieved if desired on stage and in an audience of several hundred."

Not exactly technical specs. Sounds more like hype to me.

Try not to waste your money on this one…

PS,

If you are really sold on the concept of a radial pattern loudspeaker, why not build yourself one. It is a relatively simple design that I am sure you could build. Really.

Right - ascoutic guitar amps are great but that’s not my application, i.e., I’m looking for something to replace an entire PA system.

I wouldn’t have a clue on how to build a cylindrical radial speaker?!?!

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I’m looking for something to replace an entire PA system.

I don’t think it’s intended to do what you want. It’s intended to make something like a solo acoustic artist or small group sound the same as he or they would sound unamplified, though louder. A standard PA doesn’t intend to do that since its point is to project the sound into the audience. The pole should “sound” is if there is no amplification at all while a PA is there to amplify. There’s a fine line between the two.

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I don’t think it’s intended to do what you want.

Yes & no - I have researched it alittle bit. The L1 is designed to completely replace the conventional PA & monitor setup, so the vocalist(s) is supposed to have one, hence it does do what I want. The difference is that Bose envisons every member of the band having one.

The L1 has 2 mic inputs & 2 line inputs, so to make one L1 replace the entire PA you would still need a mixer.

The only negative I’ve heard in using it this way (other than general Bose “sound” issues), is that it is too loud from behind the band, where it would have to be for it to serve as both a monitor & a main.

What I am curious about is, cand you place it so it isn’t directly behind the band, because it has 180 deg. dispersion angle. No one has answered this question yet.

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Spectral range: D below E string on the bass guitar, and above


Above? Hmmm, that’ll be F yeah?

So, a three-fret range. Damned impressive. :D

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Output: rock concert levels can be achieved if desired on stage and in an audience of several hundred.


Several hundred in a rock concert! Shee-it! I used to fall over more people than that on my way to the Port-a-potty! :D

Sorry, a four fret range.

I’ve never been able to count adequately since my accident when a neighbour bought a bulldog whose arse looked just like a mailbox. :(

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What I am curious about is, can you place it so it isn’t directly behind the band, because it has 180 deg. dispersion angle. No one has answered this question yet.


If you have a big enough butt hole, you could jam it up your arse so that when you sing into the mic, the sound that comes out of your face is really loud and you really wouldn’t need a monitor. And you probably wouldn’t need a stool either…
:p
Please excuse that remark, it isn’t meant personally. It is just how my mind works sometimes; you know, visual concepts etc…

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What I am curious about is, cand you place it so it isn’t directly behind the band, because it has 180 deg. dispersion angle. No one has answered this question yet.

The design of the thing answers it for you. It’s meant to put behind you so you don’t need monitors. By moving it forward as you suggest you are using it in a traditional PA configuration which will means you will still need monitors if you needed them before. That also means you will be using it no different than a traditional PA. If the idea is to replace a traditional PA with these things then why bother? Get a good tradional PA that costs less. If this a “these look cool factor” then get 'em and use 'em how ever you want.

The short answer is of course you cand place it so it isn’t behind the band. By doing so you are defeating the designed purposed, but nothing stops you fromd doing itd.