Click Track - snap to grid

wish I would have been told

This might be an unnecessary post but, in light of something I’ve just been taught, I thought maybe new users would find the information useful. Makes me realize how much of a new guy I still am and how much there is still to learn…

Probably the first thing I should have ever been told about is the imprtance of snapping a click track to a grid. I was told in the beginning of my home studio endeavors how necessary a click track is and I have always used one. But, I never snapped it to a grid. I recently started to draw MIDI drum tracks and snapping to the grid is a fantastic aid.

New peoples: If you snap your original click track to a grid, ALL of your subsequent tracks will be right on. If you decide to go back a few months or years later and add a bongo part or more percussion, whatever, it will all be easy to do by just drawing on the grid. It will always line up. A whole new drum track is relatively easy to do…get the beat and line it up on the grid…

I can’t believe I never figured this out until now… If I go back to a project I did a couple years ago and want to change the drum tracks, I can’t do it. None were based on any concrete timing, just sort of put in to go with the music…

So if you’re just starting out, keep your click tracks snapped to the grid…even if you don’t really understand why…its really helpful down the road.

cliff

:cool:

I’ve been using n-Track for several years now and I’ve never figured out how to snap a click track to a grid. How do you generate the click track? Are you using midi?

I’ve just been recording a click from a metronome but I would love to be able to snap that to a grid but I don’t know how. A quick tutorial, g8torcliff, would be greatly appreciated.

Best click tracks are generated using a software drum machine like Algorythm or Hammerhead or Hydrogen. Generating a wav file that plays perfectly in time is what you want. My experience with MIDI is the opposite. You set ntrack to whatever tempo BPM you set in the drum machine software. It works flawlessly.

This is what I do.

1) Set the tempo
2) Create a MIDI track (quarter notes for starters - every blue moon something different)
3) Play that out to an external MIDI device (Yamaha something or other) usually as a COW BELL (got to have more cowbell)
4) Record the audio of that MIDI box to a track
5) Open and zoom into the first cowbell
6) Manually slide the beginning of the track so that the first cowbell is right after the grid - use this opportunity to insert however much silect you want at the begining of the song (needed so I can run to get behind the drums - but there are otehr good reasons)
7) Make sure that all the clicks are steady and aligned just as the first one is
8) Record the rest of the song

So far I’ve only had a few problems where the whole tracks wasn’t perfect from the start. Usually there is no need to even slide the track at all, except to add some additional time at the beginning.

Tip 1: Don’t put the first MIDI note as the first note in the first measure.
Tip 2: Always start recording at the very beginning of the song. MIDI almost requires that (could be a bug in n-Tracks)

Most problems using MIDI usually stem from using software synths or there is some issue with the MIDI device driver.

And if you record your click as audio from a drum machine, very carefully check how it lines up with the grid.
100 bpm is not necessarily 100 bpm. My Roland’s 100 bpm translates into 99.98 or so on the n-Track grid.
Being a MIDIot that’s a real bummer!

I create a click or simple boom-slat drum drum using Fruity. Export a wav, import to n-track at the same tempo, turn on the grid and away you go.

I can update the drum track as many times as I want and just re-import it into n-track.

Editing is easier too when you audio lines up with the grid. Cutting and pasting the odd bar here and there is easy.

Quote (XonXoff @ Feb. 24 2007,08:53)
I create a click or simple boom-slat drum drum using Fruity. Export a wav, import to n-track at the same tempo, turn on the grid and away you go.

I can update the drum track as many times as I want and just re-import it into n-track.

Editing is easier too when you audio lines up with the grid. Cutting and pasting the odd bar here and there is easy.

Ditto for Fruity, and the methodology.
:cool:

I’m pretty new at this but here’s how I start my projects now…

1) Insert a blank MIDI track
2) Open the piano roll for the track
3) Set ‘notes’ to eight
4) Set the tempo at whatever
5) Toggle the grid "on"
6) Draw the first few click notes (phoo uses a cowbell, I use a tambourine)
7) Highlight and copy the notes
8) Move the cursor to the paste point, right click and do a “multiple paste”. (20 repetitions goes pretty long).
9) Snap it to the grid and you’re good to go…

I don’t know if this is the normal way, but so far its how I am doing it.

I also have Reason and you can export a MIDI track from there and then import it to NTrack. Snap it to grid and head on…

I guess, no matter how you arrive at the click track, the important thing is to SNAP IT TO GRID.

HTH

cliff
:cool: