direct record to hard drive?

can N-Track do this?

Hi,

I record live concerts, and must find a multitrack software which does not create temp. files (which then must be saved to a folder).

Instead, it should record the .wav file directly, so that when “stop” is pressed, the files are saved in the folder and a new recording can be started (in a new folder).

The reason is that sometimes there is only a couple of minutes setup time between sets, no time available to save 16 one-hour tracks (Audition, for example, takes 15 minutes to save the files).

Does N- track do this “instant save” after recording?

Hi Donr,

As long as I’m interpreting your question correctly, the answer is yes. I actully just did a quick test because I was curious exactly when the WAV files appear in the song folder. The answer is as soon as you click “record” button a WAV file appears in the directory and begins to grow.

Also I imagine that this means that even if somone were to trip over a power cord and shut down the computer in the middle of a recording session (I didn’t try this but it’s very possible at a live event), the partial WAV files would still be there.

-FD

I can concur with firstdivision that n-Track does indeed save directly to a wav file. I have been recording live sessions (4 45min 2 ch sessions per gig) with nTrack for about two years now. When I hit stop at the end of each set, those wav files show up in n very quickly (1-2 sec on an old pentium laptop).

I think the delay when you hit the stop button is caused by n-Track analysing the file so that it can draw a picture of the wav on the screen.

However, any program has to rewrite or add the wave file header after recording is complete, because the header contains info that isn’t known until recording stops (e.g., file length, number of samples, etc.)

Another issue is that n-Track builds “peak files” to help it display quickly. If you don’t have “build peak files while recording” selected, n-Track will seem to lock up after a long recording session – but really it’s building peak files (we might get some indication of that with V4, but with V3 it wasn’t obvious). These peak files aren’t critical, n-Track will rebuild them if they’re missing.

I think that you do have to hit “save” to preserve your files before opening a new project. Also you want to name the file before you start recording so that each wave file generated is named for the song or they will all be named “new song #”. Once you get too many files named "new song you will have great difficulty sorting them out. You could name your song files before the gig then open each one at the start of a song and hit save before you start the next song. It shouldn’t take very long.
ntrack seems to take less then two seconds to save the tracks never minutes.

As soon as you hit record a wave file is created. Once you click stop the file will be in the N-track folder (Im assuming you can configure this). You can also configure N-track to ask you for the name of the track before you record.

Download the shareware and try for yourself.

Good luck

PS, I have used N-track for work related training. Some of the trainings where for whole hour and never had problems with large files. This will also depend on your hardware.

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I think that you do have to hit “save” to preserve your files before opening a new project.

No, just to save the song file. The wave file headers get saved when you hit Stop.

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Also you want to name the file before you start recording so that each wave file generated is named for the song or they will all be named “new song #”.

Good point! I always use “Save song as”, and then create a new folder with a descriptive name, and then save the song file in there using a short name like “Set1” for convenience. I generally save subsequent sets in the same folder for live work. For studio work, I use a new folder for each song.

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You can also configure N-track to ask you for the name of the track before you record.

Yeah, but what a nuisance that is! I generally just name the files later from my notes. The last thing I’d want is for the band to be just about to start a new set and there I am typing in 16 file names!

But I should have made it clear above, that n-Track works fine for this kind of application. It’s not the most convenient imaginable during mixdown in this case, though I doubt many DAW programs are. (One would hope that ProTools is better!) But it’s manageable, and mixing down a full night of 16 tracks is going to be a big project in any case.

Starting new song files during breaks can help a bit to keep the files a more manageable size. Regardless, n-Track seems to handle big files just fine. Certain kinds of destructive edits take a long time, but you can avoid the need to do them. Deleting a section of a wave file is an example – takes a long time, and there’s really no need to do it.

It will take a little fussing and experimentation to find your favorite work method for the mixdown process. There are a number of options and issues – just technical details concerning work flow.

In the scenario donr is describing, I would use an HDR and fly the tracks into n-Track for editing later. Just my $.02. Having made that small donation… I am in the process of doing a permanent install at our church of a PC based setup with a MOTU 24io interface. Our services rarely run over an hour so I don’t see this as a big problem. Punch record and let n do it’s thang. Then I’ll take the whole shebang home on a portable hard disk for editing. POC.

TG