Gated Reverb

How do you do it

Eyup!

I’m doing some experiments with gated reverb at the moment.
I’d like to get those long reverb tails without muddying up the the rest of the audio.
So what I’m trying to do is use a gate to gate the output of the ntrack etc. reverb plug in an inverse manner to the audio input, that is to allow the wet signal through, but only when the dry signal falls below the gate threshold. To do this I need an inverse gate.
So far, the only ones I have found only accept midi as the key. I don’t want this kind of a gate.
Are any fellow ntrackers using gated reverb?
How are you doing it?
Obviously, as a Yorkshireman I am looking for something not only free, but preferably something that the developer will pay me to use :D

Steve

Interesting topic Steve.

Of course another way to do what you want (reverb tails at the end of phrases) might be to use effects/volume automation.

With a conventional gate you can get the opposite effect - the reverb stops when the signal stops. Consider a snare with reverb that dies away quickly one the snare sound has stopped. No muddy bluring of consecutive snare hits, but with the added width that reverb gives.


Mark

Eyup!

That’s exactly what I want to do Mark and yes, I could do it by inserting a reverb plug in an AUX bus and automating the effect return by hand, but the work involved would be just too much.
That’s why I’m looking for a software solution.

Steve

How about a side-chain compressor, set for expansion rather than compression?

Or better yet, a “ducking” plugin, which is used to reduce one channel when the other channel is loud, used for voice-overs to diminish the background sound or music.

I don’t know of examples of either of these, but they’ve both been discussed here. I believe Mac at audiominds.com knows about ducking, if nobody here remembers.

Eyup!
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Or better yet, a “ducking” plugin,


I found “Sidechain Gate” over at KVR. It’s not a true sidechain plug but it does have a ducking mode and I’ve been working with that.
It’s looks promising, I’ll post my observations after I’ve had a good play with it.

Steve

I thought the usual reverb/gate method was to load in this order

Reverb --> gate in an aux and then crank up the gate to chop off the tails before they decay fully and tweak to change the attack of the gate also…

Eyup!

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crank up the gate to chop off the tails before they decay fully


That’s sort of what I want to do, but only if there is another note following, so the tail does not overlap the next note. If there is no other note, I want the tail to decay naturally. Hence the “reverse gate” thing.

Steve

Sounds like you need true side-chain ducking to me. What is the limitation (making it not true side-chain) on the side-chain gate plug-in you found?

Quote (Beefy Steve @ Nov. 11 2005,15:14)
That's sort of what I want to do, but only if there is another note following, so the tail does not overlap the next note. If there is no other note, I want the tail to decay naturally. Hence the "reverse gate" thing.

Steve

Quit being difficult and get your Phil Collins on. :D

Eyup!

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What is the limitation (making it not true side-chain)

It uses one channel of a stereo pair as the key and the other as the signal input.
Or it can accept two stereo pairs, one pair as the key.
You cannot assign a mono track as key or signal.

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Quit being difficult and get your Phil Collins on.

I gotta lose some hair and put on a lot of pounds to qualify :D

I think this plug has some potential for the Phil Collins sound.
My next thought is to record the wet signal from the reverb plug, mix the wet & dry to a stereo pair and then run that through the gate.
If I get the envelope parameters right, that should give me what I’m looking for.
It’s a bit of a long-winded process though.

Steve

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Are any fellow ntrackers using gated reverb?

I use it on the drum track on the live recording I just made (that was the “secret” effect I was talking about on my Anything Else post - if you read that). I don’t really know how to use it scientifically but I like the effect on drums, so I use it. The plug-in is Steinberg Wunderverb which was free when I got it. I’d be happy to email to anyone if they can’t find it.