How do you remove the pops between

adjacent wave files?

When you have 2 separate waves files that butt up against one another there is a faint but noticable ‘pop’ from the ned of the first wave and the start of the second wave. Is there a way to remove that? I am using the grid to try and line everything up.

I’ve had good success with highlighting the overlapping parts and then clicking on the “crossfade” button, though I’m sure there are loads of different appraoches to doing this.


(jmccullo @ Jun. 21 2007,07:37)
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I've had good success with highlighting the overlapping parts and then clicking on the "crossfade" button, though I'm sure there are loads of different appraoches to doing this.

The thing is the 2 waves files don't overlap. They butt right up against each other using the grid control. Is there a grid settings I can adjust to make the waves files have no gap whatsoever?

Using the magnifier glass, stretch the waves out until you can see if there is a spike in-between the two, if there is use non destructive cut and edit out the pop

The answer is “very carefully”.

The problem here is that the end of the 1st wave file and the beginning of the 2nd don’t match. To get a good join, the waveforms have to meet at roughly the same level and with roughly the same slope (angle).

The easiest way to do this is to have a little silence at the end and beginning. Of course, that’s not always what you want.

Usually when this happens, we’re using sections of wave files that we’ve copied (using drag to select, copy, drag the destination, and then paste). If that’s the case for you, the wave FILES don’t actually stop and start at that point. Instead, the “parts” or “clips” do.

If so, turn the grid off, SAVE, drag the grid handles so that they overlap. WATCH carefully what happens when you drag! Sometimes (i forget the details), dragging a handle will actually MOVE the second part, and you don’t want this! So watch for it, and undo if you goofed. (And thus the “save” above.)

Once you’ve overlapped the parts, you can try the “crossfade” function mentioned above. I don’t use that because. Instead, I zoom way in and look for a point where I can bring the two wave file end-handles together where the’re at nearly the same level and nearly the same slope. Doesn’t have to be exact, just close.

Cheers
Jeff

Thanks for the tips. I am sure they will work but it seems that it will be very time consuming if I need to do this in 5-6 different spots in my project.

I think I might be doing something fundamentally incorrect because this seems like a very basic concept.

Let’s say you have 5 minute guitar part to record. You dont want to record all 5 minutes in 1 take, so you split it up into 3 takes and then want to merge the 3 takes into 1 large part. What is the best way to accomplish this?

Thank you everyone.

Eyup!

The easiest way is to record them as seperate tracks.

Steve

Here’s a technique I’ve used to fix things like this. I have done this in my wave editor (Sound Forge), but I don’t see any reason you couldn’t do the same in nTrack.

Mix all of your sections down to one continuous wave file and put it on a separate new track. Then zoom way in on the pop; then select and mute that tiny little section where the pop occurs. With the waveform zoomed in almost to the sample level, the microsecond of silence would not be audible.


HTH!

Don

One way is to make sure that you’re not jumping the beat when you start the part (so that it starts with a tiny instant of silence), and that you end the part an instant before the 1 beat for the beginning of the next round (so there’s an instant of silence at the end). Then you’ve recorded a part that’s easy to cut/paste.

It’s not always so easy to do, though.

And Beefy has a good idea too: paste the part into alternating tracks (with grid on), turn the grid off, and pull the end handles a bit to stretch the track out at both ends – assuming the part starts and ends in silence.

Sorry, but music editing is time consuming. I’ve been doing it since the 70’s, and believe me this is NOT time consuming compared to what we had to do using tape!

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Instead, I zoom way in and look for a point where I can bring the two wave file end-handles together where the’re at nearly the same level and nearly the same slope. Doesn’t have to be exact, just close.

That’s exactly what I do in cases where you have to butt two files together. Yeah, it’s a little tedious but it’s not that time consuming once you get the hang of it. If you only have to do this 5 times in a project consider yourself lucky.

Hi Gents:
There was an earlier version of n-Track that managed this type of editing very well… I can’t remember the version-or-build… But lets say it was v3.3 builds ?? 1516… I know that had the feature…

I can remember cutting and pasting parts together… When you had the part removed, and you slid the parts back together, the .wav (.npk file) had a small blue circle… This circle appeared at the very instance there was a correct mating of the two files… The only time (Way) you saw this was to expand the files out to a Hi-Magnification. I still do this type of editing using n-Track but in the current builds I’m using for this type of editing I don’t see this “Blue Circle” anymore…

[EDIT]
Maybe, this blue circle is there and I don’t look for it anymore…

[Anyway]
This Blue Circle appeared at the instance there was a “Zero” amplitude in the joined wave files…


[This post editing is back-and-working… again… Great]…
Now, I drag the joined file one-way-or-the-other and then loop the section and drag again till I hear the correct “feel” of the two joined files… Sort of Trial-and-Error… Then I take that track and render (mixdown) the resultant wav file…

That is… after saving the editing process to a .sng file and re-name the “EDIT”… in case I have to go back there are re-edit the process again…

After you’ve made enough mistakes doing this type of editing you quickly learn the procedure of what is acceptable and what isn’t when putting a track together…

The School of Hard Knocks…

Bill…

OMG learjeff has done the tape splicing thang!

Wox, you can get the little circle without being at zero; I do this all the time. I’m not sure what it takes to get the little circle, and the little circle is no guarantee that there are no pops, and you can get a good splice without the little circle. However, it does indicate that the two clips are snug together.

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OMG learjeff has done the tape splicing thang!

Um, … not what I’d call “successfully”.

I was playing around last night and I figured it out. Basically you just line up all the .wavs using the grid. All the wavs need to be on the same track. In order to smooth everything out and consolidate into 1 long .wav file, I ran the ‘bounce’ function on the whole track (this never existed in the 3.x series). I don’t know how or why but after I bounced, the pops were apparantly gone!

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However, it does indicate that the two clips are snug together.

From what I’ve seen that’s all it means. There’s no overlap and there’s no gap. It doesn’t take what’s in the clips into account.

(lbra73 @ Jun. 22 2007,10:44)
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I was playing around last night and I figured it out. Basically you just line up all the .wavs using the grid. All the wavs need to be on the same track. In order to smooth everything out and consolidate into 1 long .wav file, I ran the 'bounce' function on the whole track (this never existed in the 3.x series). I don't know how or why but after I bounced, the pops were apparantly gone!

I'm mystified. Something isn't working correctly, because this shouldn't fix it. Well, bless your luck, until the problem works the other way for you.

(learjeff @ Jun. 22 2007,11:43)
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(lbra73 @ Jun. 22 2007,10:44)
QUOTE
I was playing around last night and I figured it out. Basically you just line up all the .wavs using the grid. All the wavs need to be on the same track. In order to smooth everything out and consolidate into 1 long .wav file, I ran the 'bounce' function on the whole track (this never existed in the 3.x series). I don't know how or why but after I bounced, the pops were apparantly gone!

I'm mystified. Something isn't working correctly, because this shouldn't fix it. Well, bless your luck, until the problem works the other way for you.

Learjeff,

In a nutshell, when I had the wave files on different tracks, there was a pop from where the first wave file ended and the second wave file began, EVEN THOUGH the wave fileswere lined up via the grid. The fact that they were on different tracks caused the pop.

Once I pushed all of track 2's wave files into track 1's spaces the pops were gone. I consolidated the whole thing using the bounce feature.

I hope this makes sense.

HELP/ contents - section 2.2 explains how to drop the volume between wave files in track - the automation buttons mentioned are between the METER and TRANSPOSE number box’s above timeline -

Dr J

Sounds like n-Track v5 has a nasty little bug then. I’m running V4, but if I upgrade t V5 and see that problem I’ll file a bug report. Trust me, it’s not supposed to work that way. It should not matter which track your clip plays in.

There might be other factors that contribute to the issue; I’d have to recreate it in a trivial case to be sure.

So don’t think you’ve learned a general lesson that tracks need to be on the same track. It shouldn’t be the case, in general. Thanks for clarifying in any case.