How to chop it up...your opinion please

not steak or yard debris, but a wav file

Okay,

So I’m sure there are several ways to do this, but I’m hoping to find a better way…

I record rehearsals, and have not the opportunity to stop and start between songs. What I end up with is naturally a really long .wav file. What is YOUR favorite way to turn one really long .wav file of many songs (with periods of junk/chatter in between) into individual .wav files of just songs for burning practice CD’s for the band?

:p

Soundforge

Nero.
http://www.audiominds.com/mastering/nero.htm
Once you’ve set the splits, you can move around the song order, remove them all together, repeat them, ect al.

I use Goldwave 5.1 to do this. You can select sections and delete them out & not just leave a space with silence.
I do this before I use them in N-Track to add effects etc.

…or just partial mixdowns in n-track.

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I use Goldwave 5.1 to do this. You can select sections and delete them out & not just leave a space with silence.

With Soundforge, you can do it the opposite way - drag and select the song from the parent wav, and drag it to a spar section of workspace in SF, which will put the selection down as a new file. Rename, save, and close.

There you go. Our favorite 4 or 5 ways of doing this. :)

i have a method that might be more time consuming but is much more powerful in my opinion. it’s along the lines of the nero technique, but works with any burning software. set your n-track timeline to 75fps (instead of the usual 30). THIS IS CRITICAL because standard CD audio uses 75 frames per second. if you leave it at 30, your tracks will not start precisely where you want them to. now set all your songs up in order by nondestructively cutting away the junk between songs and dragging them closer together. you can even apply fades and stuff. now make note of all the start times… at what time the first note of the song occurs. zoom in really far to be precise. back up about 10 frames for good measure, and write it down. track one will generally be 0:00.00, track 2 might be 3:24.67 (if thats how long track 1 was), etc. mixdown the edited set. now open up notepad and paste the following:

FILE “New song_mixdown01.wav” WAVE
TRACK 01 AUDIO
INDEX 01 00:00:00
TRACK 02 AUDIO
INDEX 01 05:50:65
TRACK 03 AUDIO
INDEX 01 09:47:50

…and so on, for however many tracks you have. indentation doesn’t matter by the way. change the first line according to the filename of your mixdown, and change the times to what you found in the timeline. note that the format uses 2 colons (0:00:00) and not colon-period (0:00.00), so be sure to do it this way. you can also type in commands for CD-TEXT, do a google search for “cd cue sheets” and you should figure it out in no time.
suppose you want to make a cd of 2 practices. easy.

FILE “Practice One_mixdown01.wav” WAVE
TRACK 01 AUDIO
INDEX 01 00:00:00
TRACK 02 AUDIO
INDEX 01 05:50:65
TRACK 03 AUDIO
INDEX 01 09:47:50
FILE “Practice Two_mixdown01.wav” WAVE
TRACK 04 AUDIO
INDEX 01 00:00:00
TRACK 05 AUDIO
INDEX 01 05:50:65
TRACK 06 AUDIO
INDEX 01 09:47:50

there is no limit to how many files can be referenced. also, don’t make your tracks less than 4 seconds because it will go against cd “red book” standards. now save the text file as “compilation.cue” (anything.cue). include the quotation marks when you type it, so notepad doesn’t add the regular .txt extension. save it in the same folder that your mixdowns are located in. now open you favorite burning software, and choose to open a cd image (file>open in nero). you might need to view all filetypes. select your cue file and burn away!

EDIT: one more thing i should mention. if you have a soft-limiter plugin on your master channel (such as Waves L2 Ultramaximizer) it might delay its output, even during offline mixdowns. the result is extra silence at the beginning of your mixdown, which will throw off your numbers slightly. to work around this, make a new songfile in n-track, and import your mixdown to track 1. get your start times from here, instead of your original songfile.

more info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cue_sheet

Yow!

Great! I can use ALL of these ideas. Not only do I have Nero, but an older version of SoundForge as well (and of course n-Track).

Very cool. Thanks for the help!

Mark A, I’ve been using the partial mixdowns in n-Track, but the system I’m using to do these is s-l-o-w…think Pentium I 200mHz laptop. Ouch. Not sure if any of the ideas will save time processing-wise, but procedurally they may. And actually there may be quite a bit of saved processing time with your version, ‘yeahforbes’, as it avoids the creation of individual .wav files, and selection occurs non-destructively so there is no destructive processing at all!

Thanks everybody! Now I have more time to chop up my yard debris! :D

Hi Willy!!

I like the way SoundForge does this I’ll have to try it.

I use Goldwave to clean up noise etc,as well.

Hi all,

I do this all the time and use N-Track for almost everything but this is one thing that it does not do well yet. I think the very best way of handling this is with Wavelab 4.0 or higher. It is extremely easy to create a CD or WAV. files on the hard drive by loading the long WAV file into Wavlab. If you have a multi track mix use the mixdown function of Ntrack to create one large stereo file. Next load into Wavelab and just drop in CD track markers wherever you would like. I use a combination of “start” and “end” markers to isolate parts of the song that I want from the garbage space. You also can use “splice” markers for track marks where there is nothing to cut out. After you have done this and saved the file use the “Basic CD” option, choose the file and see all the tracks, add digital pauses to tracks and audition the layout with the pre-roll feature. Then you can burn directly to CD or create separate WAV files on the HD. This works very well and I purchased a copy of an old version of Wavelab, off eBay, just to create my Cd mixes with. If I could ask Flavio for something it would be a feature similar to this for Ntrack

WWW.AwardAudio.com My Webpage

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Hi Willy!!

I like the way SoundForge does this I’ll have to try it.

I use Goldwave to clean up noise etc,as well.

Try the same method in Goldwave, every chance it will work… or not.
Quote (Mark A @ Jan. 16 2006,03:08)
........or just partial mixdowns in n-track.

Fresh idea, thanks.

Hey, there’s no need to mixdown. Just splice (or cut-and-paste) the wave file in n-Track and then trim each piece! Creates a new wave file with the option to keep or delete the old one. Any reason no one else has mentioned trim yet?


chuck

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Hey, there’s no need to mixdown. Just splice (or cut-and-paste) the wave file in n-Track and then trim each piece! Creates a new wave file with the option to keep or delete the old one. Any reason no one else has mentioned trim yet?


Have you got Destructive Editing enabled for that?

Quote (Mark A @ Jan. 18 2006,05:36)
Have you got Destructive Editing enabled for that?

Nope! It’s technically not destructive editing because it creates a new wave file. While you’re editing in n-Track (without destructive editing) you’re just editing parts, which are just references to wave files. You can have ten different parts all pointing to the same wave file – to different sections of the file or all to the same area. Well, once you have your part edited to where it only plays back what you want it to play, then you can go ahead and Trim it (Trim is under the Edit menu) so that a new wave file is created, holding a copy of what was being played by that part.

When you do your first trim, it will ask if you want to delete the original wave file. Of course, if you still have other parts that haven’t been trimmed and are pointing to the original wave file, then you don’t want to delete it! Once you’re done with your trims, though, then you can safely delete the original to free up some space (or keep it for safety’s sake).

Using Trim to create new wave files is a lot easier than having to zoom in and write down precise time offsets into a single wave file. Just trim all your parts, and then burn them all to a CD!

hope that helps,
chuck

That’s what I’m talkin’ about!!!

All great ideas, but this last one keeps it in ‘n’, and saves both computer and human processing time!

I’ll review the stuff in the manual about splicing in “n” parts as well as the trim feature.

Thanks! :laugh:

Quote (sweet_beats @ Jan. 18 2006,14:02)
All great ideas, but this last one keeps it in ‘n’, and saves both computer and human processing time!

I’ll review the stuff in the manual about splicing in “n” parts as well as the trim feature.

Actually, trimming does require processing time. I’m on a 200 MHz iron beast myself so I recognize the value of cutting out processing time, and yearforbes’s method of creating a cue sheet for one wave file definitely uses less processor power (and less disk space too, important on my teensy 12 gig hard drive!). On the other hand, I think that trimming is perhaps less prone to accident (the wave files exactly match the CD tracks, and you don’t have to keep a cue sheet around) and makes the processor do the work for you; but it definitely has those disadvantages just mentioned.

Oh yeah! When you’re doing really precise edits, make sure to set your time format to 75 fps – that’s the same format that CDs use, so you can make sure that your waves will line up flush when they go to the cd burner.

And, finally, the manual is helpful to let you know about things, but there’s no replacement for just screwing around with stuff! Create some test recordings and then just chop 'em up to see what happens!

And then, let us know if you find something neat :wink:


chuck

Quote (sweet_beats @ Jan. 18 2006,14:02)
make sure to set your time format to 75 fps – that’s the same format that CDs use, so you can make sure that your waves will line up flush when they go to the cd burner.

just setting the time format won’t actually quantize your “parts” though… am i missing something?