How to Double a track w/ hint of delay?

This is a common technique to fatten things up a bit.
I’ve tried to add about 50-100ms of delay in N-track with no luck.
Help ???

Are you panning one to the left and the other delayed track to the right (or vice versa)?

Dave T2

Yes but how do you add delay by moving one of the tracks forward
for a 50 ms delay.

Yeah, move one of the tracks slightly until you get the sound you want. Zoom in on your timeline until you can move just a small amount with the mouse.

Dave T2

Thank You!

50-100ms is a really big delay.

usually you’d set it around 27ms. (why 27? because a pro I read about thought that was the perfect setting to delay while avoiding some multiplication errors in the algorithms or something)

anyways. I find high 20’s to be good, low 30’s MAX. otherwise it starts to sound like an echo and not two guitars.

you can also click on the track’s properties and then the wavefile properties, and adjust the offset by number

… or record another track of the same instrument!

yeah, forgot to mention… the whole delay thing works ok in stereo, but sounds like @#$ in mono. just record it twice.

" the whole delay thing works ok in stereo, but sounds like @#$ in mono. "

Not necessarily. You can get a nice delay this way that works fine in mono. You just have to be sure and check it in mono before committing.

Dave T2

I used to make ‘real’ ADT effects way back with my Boss Pitch Shifter/Harmonizer/Delay box… - It sounded like $#!t but it had a unique feature - the capability to control the amount of pitch shifting by taking the pitch from an input signal and using that as reference. Feed that with a standard synth tone with a touch of frequency modulation, and you have a sound like the ‘wow’ on an old record player. Mix that in with the original signal, and you are up there with the big-sounding guys… - The 20-30 ms delay was added by the pitch-shifting algorithm itself.

Now, if only I could find a VST capable of frequency control…

regards, Nils

P.S. I agree with guitars69 that 27 ms is an optimal value, but neither do I know why…

I found the easiest way (for me) to add a panned delay was to :

1. Clone the track
2. Add the delay(20-30ms) efx to the cloned track, and move the settings to 100% delay, 0% original
3. Pan original and clone to taste


Done

Why not using single repeat echo with appropriate delay lenght etc.?

I hate to say this but I really really really can’t stand fake doubling by adding delay and panning only. It doesn’t sound like doubling - it makes the image shift in the stereo field far to one side, or if the delay is long enough it sounds like it’s in a bathroom or hard floored kitchen. It’s a definite give away to novice sound mixing that can be heard immediately by almost anyone that knows the trick.

Double-tracking requires much more than just delay and panning.

If you want it to sound like two instruments playing the same part record another track. If you want widening of a single sound use a mono to stereo simulator or try cloning the track, panning the two tracks away from each other and putting different phase shifters or choruses in one or both tracks.

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1. Clone the track
2. Add the delay(20-30ms) efx to the cloned track, and move the settings to 100% delay, 0% original
3. Pan original and clone to taste

When I used to do this, this is the technique I used.You can experiment with not only the delay on the second track but also with other effects such as a little bit of reverb. The fliexibility to pan the tracks wide or narrow also helps.

for what it’s worth, I don’t do this anymore because it just doesn’t sound good to me. I double or even triple mic the guitar cabs with different sounding mics which, when panned, can fatten the guitar image without the smearing and muddiness that you get with the delay technique. Of course, the best way is to double track the guitar.

Quote (XonXoff @ Oct. 14 2006,07:51)
… or record another track of the same instrument!

Darn it, now I’m not heeding my own advice. I’ve just copied my post with 172800000ms delay.

… or record another track of the same instrument!

(phew, that’s better)

So you say…
So you say…

Actually, it can’t be said enough.

:)