Mixing down a video project

29.97fps???

Hi,

I’m in the process of finalising a video project (first time I’ve done one) and I’m just choosing the format for the final mixdown.

All the video I’ve shot is at 30fps so it seems natural to try to preserve this frame rate. So far I’ve been mixing down to 15fps as the software doesn’t have 30fps. It has 15, 20,25 and then 29.97!! Any ideas why 29.97 and will it work well with original stuff at 30?

Thanks

Mike

Ps It’s my son’s wedding so I want to do it justice

Hi Mike Floutier:
You could very well be plowing New Earth up here on that question…

There are a few guys up here that have ventuered into graphics/audio but I think you are few-and-far between…

More posts on this topic might very well raise the interest level… :O ???

Bill…

Quote (Mike Floutier @ Mar. 05 2006,05:28)
Hi,

I'm in the process of finalising a video project (first time I've done one) and I'm just choosing the format for the final mixdown.

All the video I've shot is at 30fps so it seems natural to try to preserve this frame rate. So far I've been mixing down to 15fps as the software doesn't have 30fps. It has 15, 20,25 and then 29.97!! Any ideas why 29.97 and will it work well with original stuff at 30?

Thanks

Mike

Ps It's my son's wedding so I want to do it justice

29.97 is the standard for NTSC (United States and Japan) video. It is essentially 30fps. What program are you using and what format are you "finalizing" your video to?

My guess is that you want to make a DVD of the event. You can render your video to Mpeg 2 stream with either separate video and audio streams or to a single Mpeg 2 file. Different DVD authoring programs will require different things. DVD Architect likes separate audio and video streams. If you render to one combined stream, it will re-render it again.

Anyway, if you have more questions, let us know.

good luck,

Mike

Hi Guys,

Thanks for your replies.

I’m using Arcsoft Video Impression 2 that came bundled with my Konica Minolta Dimage Z2 camera. Within that I selected “Cinepak codec by Radius” at 800x600 as this one handled the sky in my stills much better than the others.

One thing I found interestiing is that all the players I’ve tried the various results on would pause very briefly every few seconds. The only one that didn’t was a thing called “Power DVD” that came bundled with my e-machines PC. I’ve been amazed at how different codecs and players produce such different results.

I tried the 29.97fps on some sample video (it takes all night to render my 18min project) and I can’t tell the diference from 15fps so I guess I’ll stick with that.

I recently ordered a DVD RW drive so I’ll see what software arrives with that; I’m sure it’ll be better than what i have at present.

Thanks again.

Mike

Yeah, 29.97fps is 30fps.

30fps was specified in the original but they changed it to 29.97 to stop beats with the color sub-carrier which causued visual artifacts . But everybody still calls it 30fps.

Some apps actually support real 30 and 29.97. Best to stick to 29.97. If there’s ONLY 30 available chances are it’s 29.97 unless it’s simple freeware from a novice.

Quote (Mike Floutier @ Mar. 05 2006,16:03)
Hi Guys,

Thanks for your replies.

I'm using Arcsoft Video Impression 2 that came bundled with my Konica Minolta Dimage Z2 camera. Within that I selected "Cinepak codec by Radius" at 800x600 as this one handled the sky in my stills much better than the others.

One thing I found interestiing is that all the players I've tried the various results on would pause very briefly every few seconds. The only one that didn't was a thing called "Power DVD" that came bundled with my e-machines PC. I've been amazed at how different codecs and players produce such different results.

I tried the 29.97fps on some sample video (it takes all night to render my 18min project) and I can't tell the diference from 15fps so I guess I'll stick with that.

I recently ordered a DVD RW drive so I'll see what software arrives with that; I'm sure it'll be better than what i have at present.

Thanks again.

Mike

Hey Mike,

Check out this site. It will give you all the info you need to make a decent video. You should know that DVDs are 720x480 @ 30fps. Any less than that is going to give you lower quality. If you used the DiMage for the video, it records at 640x480 @ 30fps. I have done countless DVD recordings of analog video, digital photographs and/or digital video. As with all things, the better the original material the better the result will be.

If you plan on doing more than just this one video, I would recommend you pick up Sony's "Vegas Movie Studio" software. It comes with a very nice editing program that can render to all sorts of formats. It also comes with "DVD Architect" which is software that allows you to author a DVD (actually burn the DVD so that it is readable by home DVD players).

If you own a Mac, you already have the software you need to do everything.

good luck,

Mike

Thanks Guys!

Ok, things are going well, in fact Ive even started trying to make a video to go with one of my songs - haha! Getting my wife to perform in the garden where there is good light is a bit hard as it’s pretty cold here at the moment.

Anyway, moving along, my next problem is that, having burnt the “Wedding” project to DVD, and bought a DVD player/recorder to check out the results (yeah I didn’t have one!!) I find that quite a lot of the edges are missing one the TV screen. I tried the different settings on the DVD player but only worse.

What changes could I make to the project at the authoring/burning stage to get around this?

Also, some DVD will be going to the USA and some staying here in England. I guess I just specify PAL or NTSC during the authoring process to cover that. I noticed that I had the option to do this both in the authoring software and in the burning.

I wonder if doing it in the other, ie PAL or NTSC, format would help with the sizing problem.

Anyway, any thoughts you have would be very welcome.

Thanks

Mike

When converting from PAL to NTSC, be very careful to check how your program does it. Because most of them like Nero for example are crap. They do it by repeating frames which makes for a very jerky picture. Sony Vegas does it by deinterlacing which is almost as crap and you lose 50% of the vertical resolution. Canopus Procoder does it by synthesizing new frames which is good and DV Atlantis does it by a complete bit by bit rebuilding which is even better.

If your not sure what method is used, then if it takes half an hour to an hour to convert half an hour of video, then you have a crap format converter. On my 3.3 P4 it takes over 4 hours to convert half an hour of video and a guy at work has DV Atlantis and it takes him almost 8 hours to convert half an hour of video.

Mike,

In many editing programs you can specify how you want the Video to look when played back on a DVD player. For instance, you can render the video to be “letterboxed” or you can “stretch” it to fill the TV screen. It sounds like you rendered the video “as is” and lost some of the video in the process. Take a small section of video (1 minute) and render it different ways and see if you can find the right settings for your editing program.

As far as sending one to the US and one to England, you should render the video twice, once for NTSC and once for PAL. Then follow through and author the DVD for each area seperately.

good luck,

Mike

Thanks Guys,

We’re getting there. Come to think of it there’s often stuff missing off the side of a lot of stuff I watch on the TV so maybe I’m being too fussy. It’s certainly a steep learning curve but well worth it.

Thanks again

Mike