n-track things I have evaluation version

Purchased but now evaluation version

I bought n-track and was fine for a while (months) and now when I record, it says I have the evaluation copy and makes a sound every 20 secs.

I reentered the serial numbers and got the message - thanks for purchcasing …

restarted n-track and still thinks I’m using an eval copy.

Any ideas?

Version 5.1.1 under Vista

I think I know why all of a sudden it thinks I am using an eval copy - I switched to 24 bit sound.
No msg ever came up.
But I switched it back to 16 bit and the eval msg and sound went away.
Whatever.

Quote:

* Starting from version 4.1.5 n-Track is available in 32 bit and 64 bit (x64) versions. The 32 and 64 bits have nothing to do with soundcards and recording quality, they are related to the CPU "word length", which roughly speaking refers to the amount of information they can process with a single operation. Registering to any version of n-Track allows to register both the 32 bit and 64 bit versions. The 64 bit version will run only on 64 bit CPUs and on 64 bit operating systems (such as Windows XP x64 and Windows Vista x64). If you register the 16 bit version of n-Track you'll be able to use the 32 bit version in 16 bit mode and the 64 bit version in 16 bit mode. If you register the 24 bit version of n-Track you'll be able to use the 32 bit version in 24 bit mode and the 64 bit version in 24 bit mode.

* There is currently (and for the foreseable future) no such thing as a 32 bit or 64 bit soundcard.


keep shinin'

jerm :cool:

Which basically means that you have to register for the 24 bit product if you want to use n-track in 24 bit mode. It’s not costly and is certainly worth it.

Thanks for the info - maybe if I actually get something worth improving done, I will upgrade.

Do the upgrade.
Think about it - it is sooooo hard to get a good guitar sound out of a 150 dollar guitar, and soooooo much easier out of a 3000 dollar one.
Same principle applies to mics, preamps, and recording software (well, not the price, exactly, but the bit level matters).
I know, I know, everyone says that you gotta learn how to make a good recording with nothing more than a stick mic and a thrift shop guitar, adn I suppose that’s correct, but this doesn’t mean that there is virtue in trying to do things the hard way. One should always invest in the best tools one can afford.
I offer that as a universal truth!
:) Besides, I’ll bet you a donut your music is better than you think.

This assumes you have a 24 bit card, of course.
Otherwise, just ignore me.


???

Yeah! What Tom said.

Quote: (TomS @ Jan. 05 2008, 11:50 AM)

Do the upgrade. Think about it - it is sooooo hard to get a good guitar sound out of a 150 dollar guitar, and soooooo much easier out of a 3000 dollar one. Same principle applies to mics, preamps, and recording software (well, not the price, exactly, but the bit level matters). I know, I know, everyone says that you gotta learn how to make a good recording with nothing more than a stick mic and a thrift shop guitar, adn I suppose that's correct, but this doesn't mean that there is virtue in trying to do things the hard way. One should always invest in the best tools one can afford. I offer that as a universal truth! :) Besides, I'll bet you a donut your music is better than you think.

This assumes you have a 24 bit card, of course. Otherwise, just ignore me.

???

Some really great advice there Tom....

It would be nice though, to continue those thoughts in light of our previous discussions (firewire VS USB breakout boxes) :)

keep shinin

jerm :cool:

I would upgrade if the product was getting more stable and not less. The more I try to alter my sessions, the sooner something crashes and then is never the same. I’m looking to upgrade to another product.
I want n-track to win, but it’s not working for me anymore.

Quote:

Think about it - it is sooooo hard to get a good guitar sound out of a 150 dollar guitar, and soooooo much easier out of a 3000 dollar one.


Hey Tom!
My '64 Sears Silvertone electric rocks out!


he he
???