PC shuts down.

Configuration ?

I’ve been struggling with the Recording settings. I have now gotten ASIO to work, and can record with all but one of the inputs disabled, if I so choose. I think, so far. This has been a bit of detective work, and has involved the un-installing/re-installing a few times of n-Track (I’ve downloaded a few Builds over the days here). One of the things that has cropped up through this effort is the sudden shutting-down, and subsequent re-booting of my PC at it’s own prompting.

I also find, that as I’m going about trying to figure out how to implement a VSTi, I shut the thing down. Maybe it’s tired of my fooling with it? I’ll post another thread about the MIDI business; but in all cases, upon coming back on-line, a window pops up saying n-Track has recovered from a “Serious Error”. O.k… ???

Anyone?

Which OS are you on? If you are on WinXp and the machine is spontaneously rebooting or blue screening then the crash is in kernel mode — in a driver. That could point to the problem being audio or video driver related. Applications, such as n-Tracks, work in user mode. While applications can and do crash user mode apps work in a per-app process space and will only bring down what’s in that space. The OS keeps running.

Of course, a well written driver will not let a user mode app crash it. Many drivers are simply not written in the way that they need to be written to prevent that. Just because a driver crashes doesn’t me they are totally at fault.

Of course if you are on Win98 any crash can and probably will bring down the whole OS.

So maybe I need to go back to WDM or MME, in that case, right? I’ll go do another full-on test with those two drivers.

I’m not sure what the ‘Kernel’ mention means to me- I’m reading “switch drivers” here.

Thanks!

Kernel mode is the software layer that talks directly to the hardware. Drivers by nature of what they do are in kernel mode. Applications like n-Tracks are in user mode. That’s the software layer that interacts with us the users. Applications are always in user mode.

WDM or MME? Not necessarily. Use what works. WDM and MME have to go through kernel mode to get to the hardware but there are other layers of software they go through before getting to the hardware (more latency is a result and in the case of MME a lot more latency but more usually stability than the other two). It’s all in how well those parts of the driver were written, and how well they handle errors, including bugs in apps.

ASIO intentionally writes around much of the code that catches errors in an effort to lower latency. That’s all well and go as long that nothing unexpected it thrown at it. That unexpected stuff can come form anything, from the drivers themselves to the apps use of the ASIO device to anything in between

If the bug is in n-Tracks before the device opening part then it may well still crash all the same when using WDM or MME. After that the code paths are drastically different for all three.

So I just go at it until I find one that works with most stability. Until I load something else…

That’s understood. I mention loading something else, because I’m in the middle of getting at this MIDI thing. Never thought I would, actually- but it’s pretty cool, what you can do with it. And since I have no band presently, MIDI is a fun alternative.

Thanks for the education, Phoo, message recieved.

I gotta tell you that i had serious problems with the ASIO drivers doing exactly what you are describing Sloom. I may have mentioned this to you before ( i dont remember ) but as soon as i stopped using the ASIO drivers I had no more blue screens and no more spontaneous reboots. I have been using the WDM drivers ever since.
Another frequent poster on this forum that goes by the name of Beefy Steve has said that the ASIO drivers are known to be the least stable of the bunch.


Best of Luck to you,

Ted

Quote (Ted Roberts @ Dec. 05 2005,20:38)
I gotta tell you that i had serious problems with the ASIO drivers doing exactly what you are describing Sloom. I may have mentioned this to you before ( i dont remember ) but as soon as i stopped using the ASIO drivers I had no more blue screens and no more spontaneous reboots. I have been using the WDM drivers ever since.
Another frequent poster on this forum that goes by the name of Beefy Steve has said that the ASIO drivers are known to be the least stable of the bunch.


Best of Luck to you,

Ted

I actually had the same thing happen with WDM, too. I think… it was such a wrangle the events are out of order in my poor head! But that ASIO was definitely a booger. Too bad.

Anyway, I’m using WDM now, and so far it’s o.k. I’ve only assigned one of the two pair of inputs on my US-428 to record with, and then disabling one of those channels in the main window- all this after setting the Audio Recording devices to Stereo>Two Mono Tracks in the dialog box. I just want to dub one track at a time without having to go back and ‘Remove Track’ every time.

But yeah, you know it’s certainly an unpleasant surprise, to suddenly hear that ‘click’, and see you screen go black! ???

Thanks for the well-wish! I’ll need it, I’m now on to MIDI, way too early into my 44 years!

If it helps any, spontaneous rebooting can also be a sign of bad memory, or a failing power supply.

My wife’s desktop (AMD 2800+/512M) would restart everytime she put in a CD. I told her, that the computer didn’t appreciate her taste in music. It turned out that the power required to spin up the CD was exceeding the power supply’s ability to maintain +/- 5 and +/- 12 VDC to the motherboard and it would quit. Once the board powered down the voltage would rise and it would restart normally.

.-=gp=-.

<!–QuoteBegin>

Quote
Kernel mode is the software layer that talks directly to the hardware. Drivers by nature of what they do are in kernel mode. Applications like n-Tracks are in user mode. That’s the software layer that interacts with us the users. Applications are always in user mode.

WDM or MME? Not necessarily. Use what works. WDM and MME have to go through kernel mode to get to the hardware but there are other layers of software they go through before getting to the hardware (more latency is a result and in the case of MME a lot more latency but more usually stability than the other two). It’s all in how well those parts of the driver were written, and how well they handle errors, including bugs in apps.


Phoo, an expanded version of that would be really good on Mark’s wiki. :)
Quote (chutz @ Dec. 22 2005,19:05)
If it helps any, spontaneous rebooting can also be a sign of bad memory, or a failing power supply.

My wife's desktop (AMD 2800+/512M) would restart everytime she put in a CD. I told her, that the computer didn't appreciate her taste in music. It turned out that the power required to spin up the CD was exceeding the power supply's ability to maintain +/- 5 and +/- 12 VDC to the motherboard and it would quit. Once the board powered down the voltage would rise and it would restart normally.

.-=gp=-.

It might help. I need to look into a P4 and chipset, anyway- I'm currently running a VIA w/ Celeron. Also got a RAM chip that might be suspect.

Time to go visit the guy who made my machine, I might think...

Thanks gp.