Pop/glitch problem using N track with Cool Edit

Cool Edit 2000 not 24 bit savvy?

Finally I got somewhere with a pop/glitch problem that I have had for ages. Thought I’d share it and also maybe get your thoughts on the cause/solution.

Occasionally, I get a horrible short burst of static appearing in a project track AFTER I have recorded all the tracks and checked that they were all OK. This was driving me nuts, it appeared as if N track was inserting glitches into individual audio tracks during the mixing stage that weren’t there before - even though I wasn’t actually recording anything further and the tracks themsleves did not have the record button on or anything.

After opening one of these tracks with a new glitch in it in Cool Edit, my audio editor, something finally dawned on me - the glitches were at points in the wav where I had edited the file in some way in Cool Edit, after recording it in N track.

I am recording at 24 bit in N track, and editing the wav in Cool Edit 2000 and just clicking on the save button.

Now I see that in Cool Edit 2000 save options, it gives the options to save file as 16 bit, 32 bit float and others, but 24bit is not mentioned - could this be the problem? Cool edit 2000 not 24 bit compliant.

Anyone else seen this problem? Any ideas how to solve it, other than get another audio editor?

(N track 3, audio tweaked-Win 98SE, Cool Edit 2000, Terratec DMX6 fire soundcard, 512MB ram, 1.6G Athlon)

It must be something you’re doing while editing the file.
I use CE2K with n-Track and 24-bit wavs all the time and never have glitches.

My CE2K shows several options to save as 24-bit btw. Confusing. I think you need the “24-bit packed int - type 1” option.
Anyway, just hitting “save” will simply save it in the format it was loaded (unless you changed the sample type of course!).

The only trouble I’ve run into with CE2K is with the newer WAVEX format (used for multichannel audio mostly, but you can save a mono or stereo file with this format too), where you have to guess the offset (odd or even) before the file will open.

What do your glitches look like when you zoom in in CE?

Quote (hansje @ Jan. 09 2006,12:05)
What do your glitches look like when you zoom in in CE?

No need even to zoom in, as soon as you open the wav you can see them as they will be a couple of millimetres wide - a block that clips over 0db, lasting a fraction of a second.

The strange thing is, I seem to be able to edit them out, without the problem recurring.

Remember when editing a track in Cool Edit 2000:

Always, and I mean always do a ‘zero crossings adjust’ (ALT + E, Z) when editing, otherwise glitches will inevitably occur.

Some plug-ins are also prone to introduce glitches, e.g. mastering plug-ins or the Cool Edit filter function.

regards, Nils

Quote (Nils K @ Jan. 10 2006,09:02)
Remember when editing a track in Cool Edit 2000:

Always, and I mean always do a 'zero crossings adjust' (ALT + E, Z) when editing, otherwise glitches will inevitably occur.

I've never heard of this do you know what it does?

I turn on the crossfade option to ensurea smooth edit, but I'm not talking about little editing mistakes here I'm talking about big chunks of white noise appearing at edit points after saving the file (ie they weren't there after actually doing the edit, then listening back to check its OK.

Here’s a thought, and I know it’s a stretch but why not try…

Editing the tracks you record in Ntrack, in Ntrack?
Might not solve your cool edit problems, but certainly worth a try, IMHO. :laugh:
No need to get another wav. editor besides the two you have already.

keep shinin’
jerm

Quote (jeremysdemo @ Jan. 10 2006,22:11)
Here's a thought, and I know it's a stretch but why not try....

Editing the tracks you record in Ntrack, in Ntrack?

Mainly because there's a whole bunch of things that Cool Edit does that N track can't eg. noise reduction, and its edit options are a lot more powerful than N, which are pretty basic.

Thats why N has the option to let you choose an external audio editor in the options :)

Quote (Mutley @ Jan. 11 2006,03:54)
Mainly because there’s a whole bunch of things that Cool Edit does that N track can’t eg. noise reduction,

I’m shure there’s a free plug out there that does that, in fact I used to use one for cleaning up vinyl recordings…

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and its edit options are a lot more powerful than N, which are pretty basic.

More powerful? Uh, it slices, it dices, it perrie’s how much more powerful does a blender need be?
I have Cool Edit Pro., and I never noticed it’s level of editing power being any greater… please explain. ???
As a matter of fact I prefer Ntrack as an editor, just because I spent 7 years figuring it out, and now I’m much more familiar with the features than I am in 1 year with cool edit.
Perhaps the same could be said for you and Cool Ed?
Or perhaps the power of Cool Edit just eludes me due to my lack of an owners manual…dang pirated software!
:D
Still seems silly to me to own two wav. editors and be seeking a third, rather than just learning how to use either one efficiently.

keep shinin’

jerm :cool:

Imho ce’s noise reduction, if tweaked right, is hard to beat. Certainly not with a real-time plugin.

If you can’t see a difference in (wave) editing facilities in between ce and n, you certainly need a manual.
Or else you must write one for n-Track :) !

Quote (Mutley @ Jan. 10 2006,10:40)
Quote (Nils K @ Jan. 10 2006,09:02)
Remember when editing a track in Cool Edit 2000:

Always, and I mean always do a ‘zero crossings adjust’ (ALT + E, Z) when editing, otherwise glitches will inevitably occur.

I’ve never heard of this do you know what it does?

First you have to understand basic wave theory. Mathmatically a wave is represented on a graph (remember algebra and the XY coordiante thing?). What you see as a wave form in CE or n-track is a graphical representation of this. If you zoom in on the wave you will see where it crosses the center line. These crossings of the center line are what are called zero crossings… where the gain of the wave is 0. If you splice somewhere that isn’t a zero crossing, it will be like when you pull the plug out of an amp and hear that big pop. The wave form is no longer continous and it sends bursts to the DA convertor causing the awful noise you are describing.

Quote (Mutley @ Jan. 10 2006,10:17)
Quote (hansje @ Jan. 09 2006,12:05)
What do your glitches look like when you zoom in in CE?

No need even to zoom in, as soon as you open the wav you can see them as they will be a couple of millimetres wide - a block that clips over 0db, lasting a fraction of a second.

The strange thing is, I seem to be able to edit them out, without the problem recurring.

Mutley’s problem seems to be bigger than simply missing a zero-crossing…