Recording Acoustic Guitar

Nylon String Guitar vs. Steel String Gui

I am currently using nTrack 4.1 with Echo Gina 3G audio interface, AKG C1000s mic, ADK pre-amp (AP1), Art Tube MP preamp. When recording acoustic guitar, I have to turn the gain very high to get the VU meters in the correct range to record. I have placed the mic approximately 6" from guitar in direction of 12th fret during recording. The recording of the nylon string classical guitar appears to have too much bass when the VU meters are set in the correct range to record. The steel string guitar (acoustic) does not appear to have the same problem with the “over-powering” bass. Has anyone experienced the same problem and how did you overcome the “booming bass” ? Also, is it normal to have to turn the preamp gains very high to record solo acoustic guitar with mics ?

I’m not familiar all your gear but it should be sufficient. You obviously have a gain problem/compatibility issue somewhere in the signal chain.

I recorded a classical guitar last week (played by an 8 year old) with my Rode Nt1a straight into my (Soundcraft) mixer and I had plenty of gain.

Are you using both preamps and the same time?


Mark

Quote (arie397 @ Nov. 06 2005,17:55)
I have placed the mic approximately 6" from guitar in direction of 12th fret during recording. The recording of the nylon string classical guitar appears to have too much bass when the VU meters are set in the correct range to record.

It does take practice to mike a classical guitar, it usually is quiter than a steelstrung and if the person playing has a weak technique this will make it even harder to get good level.

6" is too close, and the booming bass you are getting is called 'proximity effect'. (btw at that distance you risk picking up a lot of fret noise and movement noises too.)

With your gear, you should have no problem getting decent levels with the mic around 12-18inches away (which is where I generally have it). I usually have my preamp at around half-way to achieve this ie still plenty of juice there.

Even with the mic at this distance I get some bass build up, which I sort with EQ after recording.

Check your settings on the preamp and also on your soundcard's mixer line-in. Sounds like something in the chain isn't quite right.

Hi Guys:
I’m fastenated in this topic… Will this day ever begin, for me. I have to get going. I’ll be late for what brings in the loonies… here…

I got it “Tracked” anyway…

Bill…

I am using only the ADK preamp at the present time but I have experienced the same " gain problem" when using the Art Tube MP preamp. I use only one preamp when recording and leave the “onboard preamps” on the Gina audio interface turned off. I’ll try moving the mic away from the guitar approximately 18" and see if that solves the bass problem. My classical guitar actually has more volume than the Taylor steel string but the steel string appears to record better. I am planning to begin using 2 mics in the near future and will continue to experiment with the placement. Thanks for everyone’s response.

Try an omni - no proximity effect.

My expirence tracking some acoustic guitars, this past project was… I had a great sounding room for the tracks and some pretty good mics… at least I though so… and the guitar sounded … well… O.K. in the room… We got ready to do a “TAKE” and got it on the drive… But from then on, it was a disaster…

We ended up hearing kids playing in their back yards… two streets over… :O ??? :laugh:

Their parents should be told about the language, they use… :p

Bill…

Just to be sure we covered the obvious, but you do have phantom power turned on, right? I and the correct side of the capsule is facing the guitar? I have seen folks get confused with LDCs before and have the wrong side of the cardiod facing the sound source.

EDIT: Never mind on the capsule. I thought the C1000 was a LDC for some reason.

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and the correct side of the capsule is facing the guitar? I have seen folks get confused with LDCs before and have the wrong side of the cardiod facing the sound source.


Been there, done that, got the red face. Easily done but doesn’t apply here as pointed out.

Have you tried another mic? Perhaps yours is faulty.

If I read correctly there are two issues here… the boominess -which is dealt with by mic placement, and the low gain which is caused by…?????

When close miking at 12th or 14th fret, I point a cardioid mike just a bit away from the soundhole, a little toward the headstock, to reduce boominess. Note that this does increase finger noise, so clean articulation is important. And I generally use EQ to scoop below about 200 Hz to reduce boominess. I’ve used this technique as close as 2" with excellent results on a very loud and deep Martin HD28 (using SM75). With an LDC, I mike considerably further away. I don’t have an SDC that I like for miking guitar, though.

At 2", the hard part is holding the guitar still enough while playing, and staying relaxed. You’ll find that this is a big problem with dual mikes, too, and the closer they are the bigger the problem is. For stereo miking, unless you find it easy to be very still while playing, you’ll find it’s better to back the mikes off a bit. A bit of variation (movement) that isn’t noticeable when recording in mono jumps out dramatically when recording in stereo. (For that reason, I more or less gave up recording guitar in stereo, and I use stereo reverb with minimal tails to provide a nice stereo image. You can hear my recordings at my website below for reference.)