Recording Electric guitar with n track

What is the best way

I am mainly an acoustic guy and I have a 25 yr old peavey amp that was collecting dust and decided it needed a friend so I bought a strat.
Now I fancy myself a bluesman ( I won’t be waiting for Clapton or BB to call) and I would like to know how you all record your electrics.I have just been miking it. I know this is pretty basic but any advice would be appreciated

Guitar + mic + amp. It works :)

What model peavy? Some of those had a very cool “saturation” I always thought.

I second the guitar amp mic thing. :)

The amp is a studio pro 80w with a 12 inch black widow speaker.It is a little much for in the house. It can really rattle the windows with the saturation set up. In hindsight I should have bought a 15 or 30w tube amp. I do seem to have some annoying hum that I am trying to figure out.It comes and goes. Thanks for the feedback.

yes i would also just setup a mic in front of the amp. You just get better sounds. Don’t plugin straight or use an effect pedal as a pre-amp. Just lousyness you get hehehe
cheers

Annoying hum/weird unwanted noise + peaveys = too often true too, unfortunatey :(
Could be a grounding problem, though…

if the hum comes an goes may be your reverb unit is not coverd completely in back of amp,i had that prob on a crate combo amp,

Hum… Strats have single coil pickups and will find any source of EM noise - computer monitors, TVs, fridges, guitar amps etc.

Try pulling the jack from the amp - does the hum go away? If so, then it’s not the amp but something the guitar is picking up.

If it hums when the guitar is plugged in try different orientations (move the guitar around until the hum lessens). Or try turning off your CRT monitor (if you have one).

When I used to play pub gigs there was one pub that we played that I couldn’t use my strat at all - the pickup from the games consoles was too great. Fortunately I had an Ibanez with humbuckers. Still can’t use my strat or tele in church with the hearing aid loop on!

HTH


Mark

Do you have a CRT or LCD monitor?
I get tons of noise & hum from the CRT.

Thanks for the advice. I cleaned all the pots, and jacks with contact cleaner.The dimmer in the room is part of it.I checked the ground which is good,but it hums louder when I touch the left front corner steel cover. I figured some is normal but I am going to run a clean ground from somewhere and see what happens.I did not know about single coil pickups inducing hum,but it makes sense.
Interesting about the hearing assist loop. The new systems actually dont use a loop around the room anymore, just an antenna.

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I did not know about single coil pickups inducing hum,but it makes sense.


Hence Hum-bucker pickups. Two coils wound and wired to cancel out hum induced into both coils.

But I just love that single coil strat sound…

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Interesting about the hearing assist loop. The new systems actually dont use a loop around the room anymore, just an antenna.


Yeah, basically it acts like a transformer where the loop is the primary and the hearing aid (or my strat pickups!) are the secondary. Didn’t know about the new systems. Perhaps we should upgrade.

hearing aid loops? What are you guys talking about? Pardon my ignorance.

You mentioned that the hum gets louder when you touch a metal part on the amp. When you touch your strings, or the cladding on the jack on the cable (if metal), or the metal rim on the jack on your amp (with guitar plugged in), does the hum get better or worse? Normally, it should get better. If it gets worse, then either (a) you have a two-pole amp and you need to throw the switch the other way, or (b) the main culprit is something on a circuit on the opposite rail in your house’s breaker panel.

Of course, you already identified dimmers, the bane of Fender players everywhere. Hunt down and eliminate them all. Most of them guiet down when turned all the way off, but some newer ones in my house actually get worse when all the way off.

I have a “Fox & Hound” type circuit tracer and use the “hound” part that picks up signals. (The “fox” part you normally clip to a wire and puts out a warbling signal, so the hound can follow the wire, but for this purpose it isn’t necessary.) I used it to hunt around my house, pointing at things to see if they buzz. They’re pretty handy little devices for solving various home wiring problems. Unfortunately, they don’t tell you the polarity (which breaker rail they’re on).

You see, 220V comes into your house, divided into two 120V halves. The ground goes down the center of the breaker panel, and the two opposite-polarity 110V lines run down each side. If two circuits are on oopposite sides of the panel, those circuits are out of phase with each other. You want your guitar on the same phase as the biggest noisemaking circuits. What you can try (I need to do this too) is to set your guitar down with strings baffled but buzzing loudly enough you can clearly hear it from the panel. Flip breakers to see which ones make the biggest improvement when turned off. If your guitar circuit is on the opposite side of the panel from the biggest problem makers, you can try getting an electrician to move circuits around to minimize the hum. Barring that, you can at least try to find what item is causing the trouble – refrigerators are often big culprits, especially old ones (or any old motors that are often running, including HVAC fans).

Learjeff,

You have a very well rounded out knowledge of things electrical I have noticed.I am impressed.I have a few gadgets around to trace circuits. I am a master electrician. BUT,I did not think about being on the same phase as the noise inducers.Good point. Been awhile since I thought of sine waves. Those motor loads do all kind of strange things ,like inducing lag currents etc. I do not claim to be a electrical engineer though ,so I still have many things to learn.

For your own info,most places of assembly (schools,churches,auditoriums,etc) have a hearing assist tied in with the PA. Hearing impaired put a reciever on their belt and plug an ear bud in and get some needed amplification. They used to put a wire loop in pvc pipe in the ceiling for a antenna, but now the unit just has a whip that does the trick at the amp.

Well, be careful because sometimes I can BS myself too!

In fact, my wife stepped out for an hour and I did just what I recommended, trying all the breakers. (I’d just been discussing this with a friend who’s a great bassist & guitarist and is an electrician, and he recommended that.)

No luck. Even when I had all breakers killed but the one my system is on, buzz like crazy.

So, I think my problem is related to one or both of two things (probably both):

- noisy pickups (which is true)
- room wiring

This room in my house is 2-wire and I’ve replaced all the outlets with GFI sockets. Believe it or not, it’s relatively new ROMEX, but 2-wire cable or else 3-wire cut all the way back so you can’t see the 3rd conductor (at any outlet). And with 3-prong outlets (which is competely wrong and against code). What kind of moron rewires a room and does it that way? Thus I replaced them with GFIs for safety. I wonder whether GFIs buzz? But I had this problem before I did that. Other single-coil guitars have problems in my house too, BTW. And I’ve used my guitar on stage where it wasn’t so nasty a problem.

Ah well, back to the drawing board for me.

I do not want to vear completely off the music track here because I enjoy playing my guitar much more than doing electrical work.Ground Fault circuit interrupters will not work without a ground.The circuitry measures the imbalance between the nuetral and ground.Check them to be sure they trip.If you have metal boxes they may be grounded but new houses with plastic boxes and cut off grounds(yes, that is moronic)would be asking for a problem.Old timers used to wrap the ground around the cable(the cloth romex,circa 1950’s) and the clamp would ground it to the box. Workable,but if a clamp loosens you have no ground.
I think that dimmer was my main culprit but as I am typing it is quiet as a mouse.Jacking up the preamp sometimes makes it worse.I just dont want a noticiable buzz while recording so I will pay attention if my furnace is running next time the buzzing gets worse. Not a dumb idea at all.Fluorescent lights are another culprit to noise also ,but I would imagine that with the new electronic ballast interference would be less

it is easy to get most hum out of your strat. you have to shield it properly. the difference is hughes.

here is a site were you can find the info about shielding and wiring and how to do it yourself. there is a lot of info there.
http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/index.php


btw the most ipmortant part is here: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php
but when you think you want to do the job, read everything. it is interesting. :p

Wow !That link totally covers shielding Strats.Thanks

FYI, 291dw, GFI outlets are rated for use on two-wire feeds. I installed them according to instructions and the test button works.

My '65 Jazzmaster is actually quite well shielded. The wells are actually lined with copper metal, and the pickguard is lined with foil, etc. I even went so far a couple years ago to take all the guts out, put 'em in a plastic bag, and wrap the whole mess in foil – grounding the foil to the cable ground. No help!

Here’s the funny part: reading that page did give me a good clue. I learned that:

DOH! I’m an idiot!

All the while I haven’t paid any attention to pickup height, and they were extremely low. I raised them up to within about 3/32" (from about 1/2"!) and while they still buzz, the S/N ratio is about 12 to 18 dB better. (Not measured, just winging it.) The big difference is that before, whenever I’d play a chord or note and let it fade out, the buzz came back in way too early. Now it’s not terrific but it’s tolerable.

The pickups are a lot hotter and livelier too, and now I need to re-adjust all my amp settings.

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All the while I haven’t paid any attention to pickup height, and they were extremely low. I raised them up to within about 3/32" (from about 1/2"!) and while they still buzz, the S/N ratio is about 12 to 18 dB better. (Not measured, just winging it.) The big difference is that before, whenever I’d play a chord or note and let it fade out, the buzz came back in way too early. Now it’s not terrific but it’s tolerable.


Heh, yeah, step closer to the mic.