Recording with 4 Condenser Mics and Delta 44

4 mics recording at same time

All,

I am using a bit old version of N-track, but I don’t think it matters for my quick question.

I have recorded with two mics at the same time, no problem. But, I would like to expand and do four mics with N-track, I have a Delta 44 which allows 4 mic in’s, so that shouldn’t be an issue.

I have one midiman audio buddy and would like to purchase another to make this happen. Is this feasible?

If so, what recording settings do I need to enable this in the n-Track program? Would it be 16 bit mono, not sure here? Just want to know if this is feasible and will work.

Thanks a million!

I should add I am using version 3.3, what settings do I change in this version and btw…what are the benefits of going to v 4?

You should be able to record 4 24 bit tracks if you want (and your system can cope). Just set N to record 4 mono tracks and away you go.

HTH


Mark

I have a P4 2.4 GHz processor and 1 GIG RAM. Should that be enough horsepower? Also, does version 4 do anything to help my cause, any benefits to upgrade?

Thanks!

I recently did a full weekend’s worth of sessions using n-Track Studio 3.x running on a 2 Gig P4 with 512 MB RAM and a 4-channel MAYA 44 soundcard. I recorded using four microphones (using two external mixers for the mic amplifiers/phantom power)and recording all four available input channels at once. This system is perfectly adequate for this type of recording.

It worked perfectly all the way through and I ended up with about five-and-a-half hours worth of four-track recordings.

A tip when attempting something of this magnintude is to lay out a working schedule of some sort. This is what worked for me:

1) Make a main folder for the whole project

2) Make a folder for each song as you move along the schedule

3) Make a .sng template with four recording-enabled tracks in it, save it with the name template.sng in the main folder, copy it and save it with an appropriate name, i.e. “Take01.sng”, “Take02.sng” etc. in the folder of the song, make sure the wave files recorded goes into the same folder as the .sng file.

4) Use a notepad to take notes as the session progresses - keep everything, even the aborted recordings and false starts.

5) Do not add any effects while recording - save them for the mixdown stage.

6) Make an offline backup (USB-hard drive, DVD-ROM, etc.) the first thing when you are completely finished with all the recordings and the musicians have gone home.

7) Mix down the best takes (now the notepad comes in handy)

8) Enjoy… :D

regards, Nils

Quote (Nils K @ Feb. 22 2006,08:37)


A tip when attempting something of this magnintude is to lay out a working schedule of some sort…




That’s a good procedure. Nothing like a pen and paper (home-made track sheets, with room for ‘notes’, gear used, etc)! And a simple folder “tree” to hang yer files on. :cool:

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I have a P4 2.4 GHz processor and 1 GIG RAM. Should that be enough horsepower?


Providing your harddrive is of the similar vintage/spec as the rest of your PC you’ll be fine. My DAW is about the same CPU and much less RAM and I can easliy record 4 24 bit/44.1kHz tracks with my Delta 44.

As for V4. If 3.3 works for you then stick with it while you sus out recording multiple tracks - no need to learn two things at a time!

HTH


Mark

Thanks all! Quick question, do you record in 16 or 24 bit? I have been using 16 bit Mono and it works fine, but should I be using 24 bit with my Delta 44 when I record tracks by myself or with my quartet with 4 mics? Any thoughts?

24 bit will give you better resolution. Do a simple test recording a cymbal at 16 bit and 24 bit and compare. I record at 24 bit 48K and only dither down to 16 bit 44.1K for the final mixdown.

I am kind of a newbie here…can you explain the dithering process and why you go down to 16 bit rather than keep it 24 bit since you recorded in 24 bit? I am very new at this piece of it.

Thanks for the info.

Mixing down to 16-bit is done because CDs require 16-bits 44.1 kHz. While some CD burning programs may do the conversion for you, I always prefer to check out the results at 16-bit first.

Dither is a simple concept at its root but pretty complicated in the details. Basically it consists of deliberately adding noise to the signal so that any errors in the accuracy of the digital-to-analog converters are distributed randomly rather than repeating on every cycle. This avoids the production of spurious tones (which are more audible) and makes the errors more “noise-like” (which is less audible). It can actually improve the resolution of the converter somewhat. Dither is also used in analog-to-digital converters as well although the “self-noise” of the preamps frequently makes it unnecessary. As to which types of dither are “better”, that is a complicated subject but in general, dither is a subtle effect and most schemes do an adequate job.

Because dither is employed to improve the performance of the converters, it is only necessary to do it for the final mixdown. Since it will add a small amount of noise, you don’t want to do it on individual tracks, just on the mixdown.

Jim

CDs are 16 bit 44.1K format. You have to end up there in order to make CDs. But leaving things at a higher resolution until that final step helps the sound.
Make your own experiment and record a cymbal at 16 bit and 24 bit. If you can hear that 24 bit recording sounds noticeably better, use it. If you can’t hear the difference, stick with 16 bit. Make a low res MP3 and listen to how the cymbals sound “swirly”. That’s what I mean by higher res just sounds better.

All the info on dither most folks care to know: Link

I’m a newbie registered today…[QUOTE]can you explain the dithering process and why you go down to 16 bit rather than keep it 24 bit since you recorded in 24 bit? I am very new at this piece of it. [QUOTE]
You dither down to what is CD spec., before you write your CD.
I wish the world would open up to DVD quality sound and dump CD’s. Mp3’s are only any good for saving space but sound rubbish. In my ipod I would rather have less files at wav quality than more files at mp3.