show your studio

pictures or descriptions of your studio

I’m still somewhat new to home recording. I like to hear or see what others are doing. I would enjoy reading about what others are using to record and what kind of space you have prepared to do it. If possible show some pictures.

I just refinished my basement guest bedroom into a studio. I installed carpet an accoustic tile ceiling and sections of studio wedge foam. I had a new pentium 4 based computor built and installed a Delta 1010lt sound card. I bought an Epson photo printer that will print directly onto printable CDs. I record using N-track 4.04 and use Audacity for editing. I have a version of Reason that came with my M-aidio stuff. I have 4 mics so far 2 sm58’s a peavy and a real cheap nady. I record guitar or bass from podxt or my digitek direct. I have a Berringer 24 track 4 buss mixer. I have a Berringer headphone amp and use an old sterio for monitors. I won’t go into the various instruments I have because I’m a bit of a collector.
I’m still pretty new at this and I don’t think my mixdowns sound as goood as some of the things I’ve heard on this forum but I’m learning.
I even am doing a couple of recording projects for a couple of musician freinds. I’ll try to put up some pictures sometime if I can borrow a digital camera somewhere.



That’s me slumped in the chair…

There is a big carpet hanging on the wall behind my desk, and the monitors are about a foot away from the wall. They’re covered with white towels in the picture… Ghetto-fied dust covers. :D

My wife would probably love that red and white curtain, John!

There’s a sort of runtrough of my home studio at http://www.yrttimaa.net/studio.html

The main picture needs an update, though… the speakers are back in upright position.

Below is a link to pictures of several of my studios through the years. Note carefully, though, that NONE of these pictures shows a good monitoring setup for mixing!

==> Learjeff.com, and then click “Studios and Gear”.

For mixing monitors, the best setup (by far) is “near field monitoring”, where you use relatively small speakers close to you (2 to 5 or 6 feet), in an equilateral triangle (with your head as one corner, and same distance between speakers as between you and either speaker). The speakers should be at ear height, or close.

An important feature for near-field monitoring is to get the monitors AWAY FROM THE WALLS! If you don’t do this, the walls will dramatically affect the frequency response curve, and you won’t have a clue what “flat” is. Ideally, they should be as far from the walls as they are to your head. Practically speaking, though, the first foot helps quite a bit, the second foot even more, and the further the better but less obvious benefit with each foot. It also helps to have absorbtive material behind the speakers.

Quote (Mwah @ Mar. 20 2005,14:38)
My wife would probably love that red and white curtain, John!

There's a sort of runtrough of my home studio at http://www.yrttimaa.net/studio.html

The main picture needs an update, though... the speakers are back in upright position.

Hey, what is with the microphone in a box?

http://www.yrttimaa.net/kuvat/studio/laulukoppi.jpg

I like knowing about creative recording tricks. So whats it do eh eh?

http://www.phootoons.com/phootunes/studio/index.html

the mic in the box maybe for vocals to avoid bleed fromm the suroundings of the studio. i do mine facing the closet.

Yeah I was guessing it was for that. I could imagine any of my friends faces though "You want me to sing into that box with a microphone in it? ??? "

Yes, the “box” is actually a section of a bookcase with doors. There’s no room for actual vocal booth, so I have to make do with this solution. Works pretty well, actually.

Maybe this one will make the idea clearer:



The picture on my studio page was taken standing on the left to the bookcase, facing right to this picture. The writing desk is by the opposide wall from the second set of bookcase doors on the right. The right side door of the “vocal box” blocks the noise from the computer pretty well.

So you did that for isolation and not dampening? I saw a nice trick where you cut a hole in the dampening foam and fit it over the mic stand so that it sits right behind the mic. Then sing into it and wha-la!

Dyers,

Both for isolation and dampening. This house is generally pretty quiet, so the computer noise (and that’s made pretty quiet) is the only problem. And a pretty little one. Anyway, close reflections from behind the mic don’t make any good for the vocal tracks, so some dampening is in order.

The foam you put the hole in and put on the stand behind the mic IS dampening foam.

See --> “I saw a nice trick where you cut a hole in the dampening foam and fit it over the mic stand so that it sits right behind the mic”

:p

Here’s the old place, a bedroom studio.



Just moved to a larger space, a loft. I’ll post pix when I’m all unpacked.

Mixing position



Listening postition



Big details about construction in this thread/turned article here (only seems to work in IE):

http://www.audiominds.com/acoustics-willy.mhtml

Willy.

Quote (Tom Hicks @ Mar. 21 2005,13:43)
Here's the old place, a bedroom studio.

Tom... I think that chair has seen better days. Seriously... Let it go, man. :;):

I picked up a nice big leather executive chair (the one in my photo) at Sam's Club for about $100. I've dozed off a couple of times in it with my feet up on the desk. zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz........

Hey, i want to play, my turn. :wink:

Where, here i where i play some ideas:


and here where i “midify” them:


This is 1 1/2 years ago, I have now a new mixing console and two more decent monitors, i will photo them.

Quote (Tom Hicks @ Mar. 21 2005,13:43)
Here's the old place, a bedroom studio.

Tom... I think that chair has seen better days. Seriously... Let it go, man. :;):


John:
Let that chair alone.. That's the "Magic" Tracking Chair. :laugh: :O

That's a nice looking chair.. I need one of them.. :;):

Bill..

Maybe we need a tread with pictures of our chairs that help us through hours of tracking, editing, overdubbing, mixing, mastering and more!



Here’s a picture of my tiny studio.