small pops at beginning and end of punch-in takes

When re-recording vocal notes or phrases, I hear a small pop at the beginning and end of each vocal punch-in recording take. It’s the same volume and sound each time, which makes me think it is not related to matching vocal volume or timbre.

Is there any way to eliminate this? Sound card is SB Live, on a new P4 machine with 1 GB of memory, fast HD, and nothing else running.

Thanks!
Ted

why bother with punch ins at all with unlimited track potential? just record a new track and silence the bits you don’t want on each track. I find this a lot easier

Maaszy

What Maaszy said, doubled! :D

Ali

It’s from the the in/out points not being at the zero crossing (the “middle” of the top and bottom). Meaning as an example, that the wav file before the punch-in may have it’s last sample at the top of the wave and the new punch-in has it’s first sample at the bottom of the wave-the two waves don’t “connect” and a pop is made.

if you turn on “Snap to Zero Crossing” in Edit, you’ll avoid this problem. everytime you make a selection, N-track will move the start/end points to a Zero Crossing and any new wav files added will not make a pop. or should not :)

or do it like Maaszy said. I prefer punching in-except in Live mode the audio cuts out and I can’t use it when I’m recording bands as a result.

Quote (maaszy @ Oct. 01 2004,11:42)
why bother with punch ins at all with unlimited track potential? just record a new track and silence the bits you don't want on each track. I find this a lot easier

Maaszy

for vocals that's a pain when dealing with FX, etc. it's nice to have it all on one track.
Quote (BretFarewell @ Oct. 04 2004,08:46)
for vocals that's a pain when dealing with FX, etc. it's nice to have it all on one track.

Just send all the tracks you have for the 1 part/instrument to a group and apply fx, volume envelopes etc to the group.

It's a lot easier auditioning/comparing takes when they are on separate tracks than if ou keep recording onto the same track. You just mute/solo tracks you don't/do want to hear.

That's what I find easiest anyway... It's not like tape where you have a limited number of tracks you have to work within so punching in as not really a concept you really need to worry about.
Think of it more as overdubbing

Rich

I agree with Rich et.al., that for the most part punch-in is a holdover from analog days, and that when you get used to just “wasting tracks”, you’ll find that it works better. But it does take a little preparation.

In general, I record several tracks for each part, or replace any bad phrases, before starting the mixing phase.

But of course, there’s always the case where we thought we could live with a little problem (or didn’t notice it), and it gets worse every time we hear it, and it’s just one small spot, so it would be nice to be able to punch in easily. The trick of using “snap to zero” only solves half the problem (the old part); if you’re playing though the punch in/out you can still get a bad splice due to the new part not being at zero.

My good ol’ TASCAM 40-4 tape deck has a great punch-in/out feature. It does a fade-in/out on the recording bias current, which has the result of crossfading the old & new parts. It would be really nifty if n-Track had a feature like this.

It doesn’t, automatically – but it does if you want to fix the pops later. The “punched over” wave data is still there. All you have to do is drag the end handles to get the two parts to overlap, and then use the “crossfade” tool. Really, this is best because you get to do it, listen, and if you want undo and try again with more or less overlap – so you get total control over the process. [Note: this is true in nondestructive editing mode. I’ve never tried a punch-in using destructive mode; it might actually alter the original wave file in that case.]