sound cards

hi

what kind of sound cards working good with ntrack ?
(i mean in affordable price )

on boards cards can work ?
cuz i tried with the onboard i got in my comp
and it really suck
it record everything in mono (one side of the track remain clean with no sound and one side with the sound)
is it the onboard fault or the program doing it ?

thanx

Hi doom:
You’re right doom… Sometimes the On-board audio cards don’t work very well for Multi-Track Recording… However, they should work better than you are describing… It sounds to me like you may be using in-correct-or-faulty patch cables to connect your audio source to your computer…

Do some experimenting with new cables or go to your computer shop and or ask around about what kind of audio cables you need to do what you want to do, in that regard…

Bill…

On-board soundcards are made with less than $1 worth of parts for beeps, boops and light gaming, NOT music production.

Good guide and suggestions:

http://www.tweakheadz.com/soundcards_for_the_home_studio.htm

A good, reliable, stable card is the M Audio 2496. It’s about $100.

thanx

about the cables
i used to record on another computer with the same stuff
and it worked fine so it’s not faulty equipment or something like that

I REALLY like the “Echo MIA” audio card as a cost effective 3 channel device (2 analog, 1 digital). Both analog lines are balanced. The converters are very good and it is very stable.


(doom @ Aug. 20 2007,02:04)
QUOTE
…it record everything in mono (one side of the track remain clean with no sound and one side with the sound) is it the onboard fault or the program doing it ?

Simple test - using the same set-up record a short file with the Windows Recorder and see if you get the same results. If you do - it isn’t the program. If the file recorded by Windows is fine then I’d suspect you need to change your settings in n-Track.

On-Board sound cards are far from perfect but can produce good results and I’d investigate thoroughly before laying out cash for a new sound card.

Plenty of built-in soundcards work just fine. Many are far better than tape decks that were available back in the 70’s and 80’s for example. However, the mic preamps in built-in soundcards are not suitable for recording music. You have to use the line inputs.

I suggest you consider working with your built-in, while figuring out what you want in an audio interface. When you upgrade you’ll be happy, but when figuring out where to spend a limited budget, the most important things are (a) good instruments and (b) monitors. Microphones and mic preamps are probably third. Soundcard quality makes a less significant difference than these, IMHO.

On the other hand, a 24-bit soundcard does make recording a lot EASIER, because you don’t need to get the levels set perfectly (carefully balancing quality against headroom for peaks).

oops, didn’t read the post carefully enough. Sorry, never mind!