Splitting master wav into CD tracks

What do you guys recommend?

I’m sure this has been discussed ad nauseum, but didn’t see it after a search of the forum.

Any point me in the right direction?

Thanks,
Aaron

The way I do it is zoom in to get the exact beginning/ending of tracks, then right click on the timeline and “Add Marker”. Once I have all the markers setup, I then zoom back so I can see the whole wav file, right click between markers (say of track 1) on the timeline, choose “Select between markers”. Then I click on the render icon (4th from the left), click on “More Options” and verify that the “From” and “To” times are correct, then render that track. I repeat for all the tracks.

Paul

OR… you can use Soundforge, Adobe Audition, Audacity (free), Goldwave, Nero etc… to chop up one HUGE mixdown if you like.

D

Do it in Nero. Willy where’s your tutorial?

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Willy where’s your tutorial?


Found it:

Willy’s tutorial showing how to split up a single wav into separate tracks using Nero

Cripes, someone please make that a sticky or link to it in the wiki…

Quote (vanclan @ Mar. 19 2006,18:22)
The way I do it is zoom in to get the exact beginning/ending of tracks, then right click on the timeline and "Add Marker". Once I have all the markers setup, I then zoom back so I can see the whole wav file, right click between markers (say of track 1) on the timeline, choose "Select between markers". Then I click on the render icon (4th from the left), click on "More Options" and verify that the "From" and "To" times are correct, then render that track. I repeat for all the tracks.

Paul

Question on this approach, does it leave any audible click or space between tracks? I have several that xfade...

Thanks and thanks for the Nero post too. You guys are always helpful.

A
Quote (akammerer @ Mar. 20 2006,10:19)
Quote (vanclan @ Mar. 19 2006,18:22)
The way I do it is zoom in to get the exact beginning/ending of tracks, then right click on the timeline and "Add Marker". Once I have all the markers setup, I then zoom back so I can see the whole wav file, right click between markers (say of track 1) on the timeline, choose "Select between markers". Then I click on the render icon (4th from the left), click on "More Options" and verify that the "From" and "To" times are correct, then render that track. I repeat for all the tracks.

Paul

Question on this approach, does it leave any audible click or space between tracks? I have several that xfade...

Thanks and thanks for the Nero post too. You guys are always helpful.

A

Nope, never had any clicks. Depending on where you put the ending will determine how much silence will be at the end. I usually cut the end at the end of any signal that I can hear of the track, then add the 2 sec space between tracks when I burn the CD using Nero. Also I also go back to each track that was made and fade out the ending (by highlighting a sec or so of the ending, then using the fadeout feature of n-Track). I also use a compressor and/or limiter, like the classic series to "normalize" it.

It was this "new" feature that convinced me to upgrade from ver 2.x to 3.0 way back when...

Paul

The important thing is to position the markers at a zero-crossing. If they are not, you may be able to play back the tracks without a pop or click in continuous play, but if you play the tracks separately there would be a click at the end of one and the beginning of the other. To avoid this (presuming you can’t find a convenient zero crossing or want to make extra sure) you can do what I call a “micro-fade” over a few milliseconds at the beginning and end of each track to insure that there is no discontinuity large enough to produce an audible pop. Such a short fade is not normally audible as a dropout, especially if it is in a quiet section.

Jim

Just to make sure I understand, you actually micro fade out to INF, and then up from INF on the next track, even if you would want to hear continuous play? Something similar to persistence of hearing will keep a listener from hearing the drop out? I’ll try this this evening.

thanks!
A

Yes, it may not be necessary but your ability to hear such a short drop-out is much less than your ability to hear a “pop” due to a transient generated when you create a (faster) step funtion by cutting the signal somewhere other than zero. Of course the size of the step determines the amount of pop so a small step might be close to inaudible whereas cutting the waveform on the peak of a bass note would produce a very audible sound.

Even a fade will have some spectral consequences if it is rapid enough so use your ears. I don’t know whether the envelope functions in N-tracks have a smoothing function applied or not. I suspect they do to avoid the pops that might otherwise be introduced if you don’t use lots of nodes. At some point I will run a test with a sine wave to see what happens to abrupt changes. In any case smoothing would help avoid noises but would also change the effect of the “micro-fades”, requiring them to be longer by some amount to achieve the same effect. Try it and see (or hear as the case may be).

Jim

Dunno, but with the nero method you can just drop the splits in anywhere you want them and it works fine. Might put something in automatically, but I can’t hear it…

To hear the effect you would have to listen to the songs individually, continuous play would conceal the effect. Also, it will occur at the very start or right at the end so you have to be “on your toes” to hear it.

Nero might actually automatically readjust the position to an adjacent zero crossing or do something similar to a micro-fade. You could probably find out by deliberately placing the marker on a signal peak, create the individual tracks then import the tracks into an editor and look at the transition to see whether it is still at a peak or if it has been modified.

Jim