The strangest synthesizer interface ever

Water as a control surface!!!

If you like to have the most unique equipment that can be had, here is the synth control surface to go for:

Weird synth

T

EDIT: One guy suggested that if you threw a cat and a piranha into it, you would really hear something interesting.

Quote (tspringer @ Dec. 13 2006,17:25)
If you like to have the most unique equipment that can be had, here is the synth control surface to go for:

Weird synth

T

EDIT: One guy suggested that if you threw a cat and a piranha into it, you would really hear something interesting.

That is too cool.

I always prefered the theremin as an interesting sound control device.
:cool:
Mike

Quote (DrGuitar @ Dec. 13 2006,19:27)
I always prefered the theremin as an interesting sound control device.
:cool:
Mike

I don't know about that Mike. After Leon Theremin invented the instrument, he travelled all over the world performing with it, BUT his travel is now thought to have been a cover for spying activities. (Theremin also design several very clever bugging devices.) So the Theremin is a commie device, and is totally out of favor with the right wing of American politics. And it sounds weird too, so it must also be an instrument of Liberal corruption. Better find another favorite or someone might start intercepting your music.

T

that brings to mind a story i heard where it was someone like the lead guitar picker from Iron Butterfly was also some weird kinda scientist in his spare hr;s and that he had been working on a time machine or sumthin an the gov supposdly took him an his notebooks and he wasnt seen again? anyone else hear this ?

This Topic is closed.

Or else!

Not dead just yet…

http://www.idea-asylum.com/watermusic.html

Quote (phoo @ Dec. 14 2006,01:01)
Not dead just yet...

http://www.idea-asylum.com/watermusic.html

I don't know... it sounded interesting for about 7 seconds then I realized I would need a strong barbiturate to continue listening for very long.

Sort of a musical Chinese water torture...

:p

Mike

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Sort of a musical Chinese water torture…

Yeah, that works for me to. Unlike wind chimes, at least they can be unplugged.

Maybe if the sounds were a bit better, instead of crappy GM sutff…

Interesting how the mind imposes order on the random generation of notes, however - I swear I was hearing melodies and harmonic progressions…

Quote (phoo @ Dec. 14 2006,10:05)
Sort of a musical Chinese water torture...

Yeah, that works for me to. Unlike wind chimes, at least they can be unplugged.
Sounds like some sort of newageelevatormusicgenerator to me :)
Quote (TomS @ Dec. 14 2006,11:04)
Maybe if the sounds were a bit better, instead of crappy GM sutff...

Interesting how the mind imposes order on the random generation of notes, however - I swear I was hearing melodies and harmonic progressions...

My students think it is funny how whenever I hear just a couple of notes strung together, I immediately start to sing a song that I associate with those notes. It is most often a song they have never heard before; sort of a reflex.

They really like it when I take a current tune they are learning on the guitar (that they love) and immediately turn it into a polka. That is a reflex my students wish I didn't have. :p

Mike

OK, what do you associate with these notes? :D

B-flat, A, C, B-natural

Hey TomS:
There ain’t enough money there to buy a Tim’s coffee…

Guy Lombardo did O.K. with them Polkas.

Bill…

I’ll give you a hint. Think German notation.

The only tunes that come to mind are the bass line of a Pink Floyd tune (Money??) and the tune “Fernando’s Hideaway”… but FH goes Bb, A, Bb, A Bb, A, C#, E… and then there’s the line in “The Planets” that is similar… But nothing strikes me… maybe if I heard it within a rhythmic context I might get it… :(

Mike

Ah, that’d be the Beatles song Tom:

BACH in the ussr! :D

I suppose you also know Tom that Bach was very keen on numerology, and he several times used his “musical signature” three times in a row.

Which, using the German alphabet, gives: BACH+BACH+BACH =42.

So, Deep Thought wasn’t the first to figure out the ultimate answer. :cool:

Gizmo wins the prize!

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“Forty-two!” yelled Loonquawl. “Is that all you’ve got to show for seven and a half million years’ work?”


:D

Say - there wasn’t an intentional Bach reference there, was there?

edit: after checking Wikipedia, I see that the entry for cultural references to the number 42 doesn’t say anythign about Bach. Should it?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki…nces#42