Trying to fix a recording

Hello

I got the n-Track studio in hope of straightening out one of my very old tapes. Basically, i have put it onto the computer through my other software saved as a wav, and now i need to remove the fluctuation in speed. It speeds up and slows down a lot causing the pitch to become horrible and the sound to become unhearable. If there is anyway of doing this on n-track a tutorial or some guidance would be very helpful. Thank you
Joe

Alas, speed fluctuations cannot be removed by any ordinary piece of software. My best guess is Melodyne by Celemony, but that will set you back about $1000, and I doubt your tape is worth that much.

My only other advise is to clean the tape machine as thoroughly as you can in order to reduce wow/flutter, or maybe borrow a better tape deck for just this playback. However, if the wow/flutter is present in the recording itself, there’s not much that can be done to alleviate it.

regards, Nils

Hi skezza:
If I hear what you’re saying correctly, you have a tape deck that has a faulty capstain drive motor. It may have been recorded that way. That would be the worst condition possible… If the project was recorded with none of those issues , then replacing the capstain motor on your tape dack will fix the issue. Then capture the project again to load it on your hard drive…

These capstain motors have servo amplifiers built into them. The servo amp fails and the shaft speed changes all over the place…

Try playing that tape in a known working tape deck… If the tape playes O.K. then the project was recorded with no issues… Then, look for a replacment drive motor for your deck.

These parts are becomming harder-and-harder to find…

You’ll find all the Good Tape Decks in the land-fill sites… It’s a shame for all that technoledgy to end up that way…

Bill…

well its not the deck. it was recorded over 20 years ago on a crappy dictaphone with as you say a knackered motor. The tape deck i used for the project is a Sony and is fine. I guess its unlucky i guess :(

That’s too bad. there may be another resolve to the issue… However, one doesn’t come to mind just yet…

Bill…

Skezza,

I am trying to understand this problem. You have a recording that was made with a tape deck that had a faulty capstan (20 years ago) and now when you play it on a good quality tape deck it has excessive “wow and flutter”. Is that what we are talking about here? If that is the case, it is unlikely that you are going to be able to correct the problem so that it sounds “good”. If you felt like spending a huge amount of time and have a very good sense of pitch, you may be able to take the file and manually try to correct the pitch “wow” by highlighting the ascending or decending sections and use a program like Goldwave to try to correct for each individual “wow”.


I think that this would prove futile in the long run since the fluctuations in pitch and speed are probably not linear and hitting each of them perfectly would prove practically impossible.

I’m sorry I can’t be of more help. :(