Video killed the radio star, and then...

check this out.

Who wouldn’t want to hear Gould or Cortot in concert again?



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Ghost concert to revive music of the past

Wed Apr 20,10:15 AM ET Entertainment - AFP



PARIS (AFP) - Music lovers in North Carolina are due for a strange treat next month.


AFP/HO/File Photo



They will hear two piano virtuosi in concert… but both musicians are long dead.


The music will be played on a grand piano that has been specially programmed to give a note-perfect, live rendition of ancient recordings made by Alfred Cortot in 1928 and Glenn Gould in 1962.


“The piano will replicate every note struck, down to the velocity of the hammer and position of the key when it was played,” the British weekly magazine New Scientist reports in next Saturday’s issue.


The key to the phantom concert lies in the transcription of the scratchy recordings into a high-resolution version of MIDI, the standard format for encoding music for computers.


The usual problem with MIDI transcription is polyphony – distinguishing several notes that are played simultaneously.


Attempts to transcribe polyphonic notes are typically only 80 percent successful, says New Scientist. About 10 percent of polyphonic notes are missing and another 10 percent are mistranscribed, which can give the replicated music a hollowness or discordance.


Zenph Studios, a software company based in Raleigh, North Carolina, claims that it has found a solution to the problem, although it refuses to say how for commercial reasons.


It has successfully tried out the Cortot and Gould pieces on the Disklavier Pro, one of only a few concert grand pianos that can record and play back high-definition MIDI files.


A concert will be held in Raleigh next month in which Corto – dead since 1962 – will “play” a Chopin prelude, while Gould, in his grave since 1982, will “perform” Bach’s ‘Goldberg Variations’.


By faithfully transcribing the notes and reproducing them exactly as they were played at the time, the technique could haul out of the archives innumerable sound recordings that have never been released because of flaws such as background noise.


Zenph’s next project is to clean up a recording made at a private party by by the jazz giant Art Tatum two years before his death in 1956, the report says.




Glad they’re planning on doing Art Tatum’s stuff, too. I think that’ll be more of a challenge for this technology, since we have the notes written down for the Goldberg Variations to use as guides, but we don’t have 'em for Art’s jazz improvisations. Don’t know if I’d go watch one of these concerts, though, unless they turn off all the lights and light the piano with two floating candelabras :D

Tony

Is it better to hear high quality midi or a lo-fi recording of the actual entertainer??

Quote (ksdb @ April 21 2005,12:00)
Is it better to hear high quality midi or a lo-fi recording of the actual entertainer??

Good point ksbd. Me? I'd choose the latter. I guess because in the back of my mind I'd be thinking "Geez, it's a freakin MACHINE!?!?" even if it was a very sophisticated machine.

TG
Quote (ksdb @ April 21 2005,12:00)
Is it better to hear high quality midi or a lo-fi recording of the actual entertainer??

From what I hear Alfred Cortot and Glenn Gould aren't making it to live performances anymore. :D I guess it is al in how you look at ti. If you want to hear Cortot, listen to the recording. If you want to hear a piano, see the machine. A live piano is still a live piano. Though, yeah, it woul dbe a bit weird liek those Disklavier things you see at Christmas in the mall.

Good point Bubba. What I want to know is how guys (like you) make programmed stuff sound realistic. Everything I have tried so far SOUNDS like a machine. I gotta lot to learn…

TG

PS Any of you guys that have never heard Bubba-stuff… Dude knows how to MIDI.

"Don’t know if I’d go watch one of these concerts, though, unless they turn off all the lights and light the piano with two floating candelabras"

But, will they ask everyone in the audience to form a circle and hold hands…

The music will be played on a grand piano that has been specially programmed to give a note-perfect, live rendition of ancient recordings made by Alfred Cortot in 1928 and Glenn Gould in 1962.

"The piano will replicate every note struck, down to the velocity of the hammer and position of the key when it was played," the British weekly magazine New Scientist reports in next Saturday's issue.

They say it will be note-perfect, but it's still not going to be the same as hearing the actual performers. This is still subject to someone else's interpretation and the relative accuracy of their transcription.

Let’s say that they can get it down so that even to experts the differences are imperceptible. There is still another argument to be made here - the original performances were made in a certain context, in a certain acoustic space and “conceptual space” (as the playing related to other performances at that point in history) that affected what Gould or Cortot did at that performance. There is no reason to believe, and every reason not to believe, that they would have played it the same way in the year 2005 in a different hall/acoustic space to an audience with more performance history behind them.

So, in the end, I will stick with my scratchy recordings, I think.

Good lord, what if they do this to Rachmaninov? :angry:

Imagine this device:
All the possible instruments (and a few androids for singing) in your car.
You put your favorite CD inside this MIDI converter and the appropriated intruments and androids starts a live personal performance for you. The new CD player is arriving…
:D :D

You’ll need a BIG car… or small androids! That’s too freaky to contemplate.

"Er, sorry officer. I didn’t see the stoplight. I was looking at android Stevie Ray’s hands trying to cop some licks…"

TG

Dance performance only in version 2 but Tina Turner´s allowed just with the car stopped!!!
:laugh:

Quote (gtr4him @ April 22 2005,12:54)
"Er, sorry officer. I didn't see the stoplight. I was looking at android Stevie Ray's hands trying to cop some licks........"

TG

While talking on my cell phone, lighting a smoke, and drinking coffee. Who's got time to drive?
Quote (gtr4him @ April 21 2005,12:41)
Good point Bubba. What I want to know is how guys (like you) make programmed stuff sound realistic. Everything I have tried so far SOUNDS like a machine. I gotta lot to learn.....

TG

PS Any of you guys that have never heard Bubba-stuff.... Dude knows how to MIDI.

The first step is to not enter everything using the piano roll and the note velocity set to 127. The second is to not quantize unless you are doing techno or you have a severe screw up, and in that case, manually fix the screw up or just rerecord it. Third, a $50 Casio keyboard for a MIDI controller will do wonders for realism.
Quote (Bubbagump @ April 25 2005,08:58)
Quote (gtr4him @ April 21 2005,12:41)
Good point Bubba. What I want to know is how guys (like you) make programmed stuff sound realistic. Everything I have tried so far SOUNDS like a machine. I gotta lot to learn.....

TG

PS Any of you guys that have never heard Bubba-stuff.... Dude knows how to MIDI.

The first step is to not enter everything using the piano roll and the note velocity set to 127. The second is to not quantize unless you are doing techno or you have a severe screw up, and in that case, manually fix the screw up or just rerecord it. Third, a $50 Casio keyboard for a MIDI controller will do wonders for realism.

Does a $100 Yamaha equal a $50 Casio ??? :p :p

Actually my problem is I can't seem to make the time to learn how to play the keys. I sound like a five year old playing "Chopsticks".

TG
Quote (gtr4him @ April 25 2005,17:24)
Quote (Bubbagump @ April 25 2005,08:58)
Quote (gtr4him @ April 21 2005,12:41)
Good point Bubba. What I want to know is how guys (like you) make programmed stuff sound realistic. Everything I have tried so far SOUNDS like a machine. I gotta lot to learn.....

TG

PS Any of you guys that have never heard Bubba-stuff.... Dude knows how to MIDI.

The first step is to not enter everything using the piano roll and the note velocity set to 127. The second is to not quantize unless you are doing techno or you have a severe screw up, and in that case, manually fix the screw up or just rerecord it. Third, a $50 Casio keyboard for a MIDI controller will do wonders for realism.

Does a $100 Yamaha equal a $50 Casio ??? :p :p

Actually my problem is I can't seem to make the time to learn how to play the keys. I sound like a five year old playing "Chopsticks".

TG

A keyboard is not the only choice you have today, there are some Guitar adapters and also Software for wav to midi, you can use your own voice to sequence a melody line in midi.
Try something like This>> to see if it works for you.