volume break up fromc.d.

cranking volume leads to song breakup

No problem playing back mixed n-track song through
p.c. speakers, home stereo.However,using
the van stereo I’am getting break up on the
passenger side speakers.All other purchased
c.d. music plays fine,cranked, through vehicle stereo
system.Thanx for everyones help.
Sincerely,
doveman26

What’s the peak db of the waves burned to CD? Some CD players are happy campers when there are peaks that bang 0 db, but some make a very audible snap crackle and pop…they distort. Hitting 0 db enough and it’s pretty audible on all players. 0 db is technically ok, but some players don’t handle it well, even if the wave doesn’t actually have any clipping.

This is different from a clipped wave. Clipped waves can happen at any volume. The way you describe the clipping yours sounds like a player thing instead of clipped waves in the source wave. We’ve discussed this at length on the forum. Because of your problem we might end up doing it again. :)

That’s not a bad thing.

The trick is to make sure not one sample peaks at exactly 0 db, but is always just a little below it. That’s all it takes to satisfy players that don’t like 0 db. Normalize or limit to -1 db (or -.01 if you REALLY need that last db) to insure 0 db is never reached.

There is also the chance that you have more deep lows in your mixes than are in commercial CDs and they are making the speakers buzz. Commercial CDs usually have all the subharmonics filtered out. It’s hard to hear these lows, depending on your speakers, and it’s very easy to not even know they are there. The trick is to filter out all lows below 50 hz or so. Doing that will usually help clarity and make it easier to raise overall volume. It really depends on the source whether or not this is needed. It’s easy to say you can filter out what you don’t hear, but when it comes to lows that only applies if you have speakers that respond down there. If you don’t it’s hard to make a judgment.

Commercial CDs usually have all the subharmonics filtered out. It's hard to hear these lows, depending on your speakers, and it's very easy to not even know they are there. The trick is to filter out all lows below 50 hz or so.

I tend to do a pretty serious low cut on the EQ of every track except for the bass-guitar and kick-drum. All of those sub-harmonics will add up to bunch of mud when you do a mixdown.

-John
:cool: