Wanted:  More Presets!

All:

I was wondering if I could solicit some input. One of the things I wish n-track had (besides the “Paul Stanley Vocal Modulator” which I’ve mentioned numerous times in the past :D ) is more presets on its onboard effects units.

For example, there are over 60 presets on my FreeAmp2 guitar effects processor (a sweet bit of freeware btw), but there are only 3 or 4 eq settings for N-Track’s equalizer, and that is a real limiting feature IMHO — especially if you don’t even really understand what you’re looking at.

As someone without a recording background, I’ve found the presets that are there very useful in “figuring out” how to get your gear to do certain things. Unfortunately, the lack of presets with most of the tools have me wondering about how to use a ton of stuff in the n-track toolbox.

In other words, and I ask you, wouldn’t it be helpful for someone to put up 3 or 4 sample Bass guitar eq presets" (maybe labeled “Bass 1,” “Bass 2,” and “Bass 3”, etc.), a couple of presets for cymbals, Male Vocals, Female Vocals, etc., 5 or 6 master eq settings, etc.?

I can also see an enhanced list of presets being helpful in reverb, compression, delay, etc.

I know adding these types of presets to the next build of the program would be kind of a hassle for Flavio, and probably take a long time, so I was hoping that some of you pros like:
TomS
DlaChance
the uber-venerable WoXnerW
HotDogWater
Yaz (the n-traker formerly known as “Yazmeister” with the good ear)
and anyone else with a setting on something they’d like to share might post photo’s of their personal preset settings to particular n-track devices as replies to this post.

I know it would help me, and I’m sure there are countless others who would enjoy and benefit from them as well.

For example, I’m particulary interested to see how someone treats the bass drum, and the bass guitar from an eq perspective. Personally, I find it difficult to separate these two instruments’ eq frequencies in my own mixes.

Well, just a thought…

Iplan

not being hard on you, but you seem to be taking a PRESET as some MYSTICAL DEVICE made up by SUPERHUMANS - NOT SO - a preset is just what happens to be set on the controls of the effect that is in use, saved and then re-inserted -

in other words all a preset can do is to replicate the levels and the settings that are on/in the effect itself nothing else, a preset can only contain what the effect is capable of and nothing else - so you turn a knob, move a slider, you like the effect then you save it you have created a preset - thats all there is to it -

if an effect/VST/VSTi has 6 or 60 presets they all are made from the controls that the device contains and all of these are available to you -it can be a letdown to find out that presets are all related to what the device contains not to some magical formula hidden within the device - but it can be a delight to know that YOU are more than capable of making better presets than the designer - one things for sure you cant break anything by trying -

Dr J

Quote:

...especially if you don't even really understand what you're looking at...wouldn't it be helpful for someone to put up 3 or 4 sample Bass guitar eq presets...etc., 5 or 6 master eq settings, etc.?


Calling up a preset may-or-may-not help your sound in the short term. You need to take the time to play with these plugins and listen - sorry, I meant LISTEN! That's the only way you're really going to learn to use these tools effectively. If you can tell the differnce between right and left and high and low, you can start playing with your EQ. Yes, it's going to take some time. And I promise it will be frustratings at times. But I also promise it will eventually pay off.

Presets are of questionable value with certain plugin types such as compressors, since the behavior of the plugin varies greatly depending on the specific qualities of the input signal.

Presets, hmm, rarely use them here. I like tweaking to the song in particular. One preset may work on one tune and totally screw the next one up. Dr.J and Capt.D have given great advice here, turn them knobs, do a mix, go kick the neighbors dog, come back and listen to it again. Playing with compression and eq between kick and bass guitar will drive ya nuts sometimes. But the more you do it the better you’ll get at it! And remember
"TAKE NOTES"!

Yaz :)

Woah woah woah! Don’t kick the neighbor’s dog! But everything else Yaz says is good. Yes, take notes - literally, pen and paper. Change a parameter and write down how it changes the sound (or doesn’t change it).

It helps to understand what a plug is doing to the signal. With some plugin types this is pretty obvious - like with EQ. It’s a little less intuitive with others (I’ll mention compression here again). Make Wiki and other online info sources, including the websites of the plugin developers, your friend. Many plugins have graphic interfaces that help you visualize the effect’s behavior. Depending on how your brain works you may find these easier to work with than just twidling knobs with cryptic labels.

you could do worse than read these articles by mastering engineer BOB KATZ - he has a strange way of writing - but there is good info here on EQ and COMPRESSION -

http://www.digido.com/bob-katz/index.php

Dr J

Hi Gents:

The replies to this thread so far are the best advice you’re gonna get anywhere…
I can add a few things that is important to me during a project’s mix session…



Something to consider…


A mix session can last several days if not weeks…



It’s something to consider…
You can’t do it all…
The Musician…
the Engineer…
the Producer…
Keep going down the List…


Having said that…


You have to come to work in a good frame-of mind…
If you’re worried about how you’re gonna make “Ends Meet”…
that ain’t gonna help you find a Kick Track sound for your song…
Generally, there are several sets of ears on a Mix Session…
They should all be set to the same page…
Other-wise you end up with Cabin Fever and a BIG Argument starts…



Having said that…


Something to consider doing as the Mix comes together is, “Walking Away” from the mix…
Go to the kitchen get a coffee or something… After listening from another room… come back to the other “Ears” with something you’ve heard from another perspective…
With it…
be positive…
being negative is a good way to become “The Go-Getter”…



Having said that…


You have to have the best tracks you can make…
The saying “Fixing the Track in the Mix” doesn’t apply…
The Tracker and Musician has that responsibility…
After that, it’s the Producer’s responsibility…

Also, eing involved on a Mix Session there has to be a list of “Ground Rules” that must be strictly adheared to.
with no exceptions, unless those changes are agreed upon mutually…

[EDIT]

The reply is Off Topic…
All he wants to know is… How to make a track sound correct…





Bill…