You know what I learnt today?

I learnt today that overhead mics don’t need to be panned directly opposite each other with the faders set the same. In the past (recorded close spaced pair above the drummer, pointing out towards snare/hihat and ride), I’ve panned them equal amounts apart at the same fader level.

I should probably explain that I record each OH to a seperate track.

Today, I panned one over much further than the other, and adjusted the levels so that the (unmiced) hihat was more to the left, and the ride was nicely over to the other side.

For some reason, it’s probably an obvious technique, but given that I’ve always tried to keep it symetrical in the past (faders, gain, mic positioning), this seems to have worked much nicer for me, at least in this case.

Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong, but please have a listen and tell me what you think of this rudely mixed effort:

http://users.ncable.net.au/~bakka/end_of_species_snippet.wma

I’d really like to know if it’s right, or wrong, or sounds like crap.

Willy.

Sounds awfully good to me.

There is a question I have always wondered about drums.

Most drummers have their hi hat on THEIR left while playing, but from the audience point of view, it is on the right.

When mixing, do you (I mean anyone on this forum) mix for the audience or the artists (meaning the POV audio sound)?

Dave T2

Mix from the audience view,but if you listen to Steely Dan records which have the hihat mixed to the left from the drummer view. Just take a listen.

Quote (Willy @ May 24 2006,10:06)
Maybe I'm right, maybe I'm wrong, but please have a listen and tell me what you think of this rudely mixed effort:

http://users.ncable.net.au/~bakka/end_of_species_snippet.wma

I'd really like to know if it's right, or wrong, or sounds like crap.

Willy.

NOT symetrically panning is pretty common as your mics are rarely perfectly positioned symetrically themselves. The only time I really say ALWAY doa hard pan with stereo is when using M/S. He rest of the time you can often twen the placement of things in the stereo image by panning one side more or less than the other.

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When mixing, do you (I mean anyone on this forum) mix for the audience or the artists (meaning the POV audio sound)?

I pan for audience.

If I’ve labeled the OH channels wrong I’m all over the place. “Was number one pointing to the snare, or the ride?”

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NOT symetrically panning is pretty common as your mics are rarely perfectly positioned symetrically themselves

How do people pan when using a 3 mic ala fletcher method? I’ve only used 5 here - 2 OH, snare (panned a bit to the right), kick (panned center), and a direct out of the kick channel (eq’d to ####)

Willy.

To me the “Fletcher” method is simply a variation on the SAE spaced pair method. Essentially you pan the mic in front of the kit center (make sure you place it well) and the other two to their respective sides and pan as hard as it suits the tune.

For overheads I measure from the center of the snare to the mics and from the top of the kick (sometimes resonant head - sometimes batter) to the mics. Mic placement is so each pair of measurements is identical. Then when the mics are hard panned away from each other the snare and kick are dead centered naturally when the levels are identical. I have a picture and some WMA samples of that up on http://downloads.phootoons.com. They are actually samples of some cheap Radio Shack Instrument mics, but one sample is overheads only.

It may SEEM unconventional, but it’s a variation of the old way of recording drums with few mics. The placement usually causes one mic to be up over the mounted toms and slightly in front of them and the other back over the floor toms. Add in a kick and snare mic to add a little more depth and you’re good to go.

http://downloads.phootoons.com/phoo_doo_overheads.html