A basic question about aux effects

As a guitar player in a working band I never messed with the mixing board as the sound guy did that. Now I wish I had learned something.

In the manual, when using an aux channel for effect it says to raise the track send to 0db and adjust the aux return slider to the amount of effect needed. If I want varying amounts of reverb (or other effects used on more than one track) on different tracks, do I follow this as a guide for the track with the most effect needed and then change the other track sends to achieve the amount of effect wanted, or is there some other strategy I should be following?

I realize this is a very basic question, but if there are practices that save time and resourses I would like to know them.

Thanks in advance

Quote (harphunt @ Dec. 14 2006,23:20)
In the manual, when using an aux channel for effect it says to raise the track send to 0db and adjust the aux return slider to the amount of effect needed. If I want varying amounts of reverb (or other effects used on more than one track) on different tracks, do I follow this as a guide for the track with the most effect needed and then change the other track sends to achieve the amount of effect wanted.

You do it just like that. I would be a bit more specific and say that you should raise the aux sends to the level that the effect won’t overload (check it at the effect’s meters)

Then you adjust the aux return so high you want the effect to be heard. (And of course with many tracks you adjust from the track aux sends if you want some track have more effect or not. There also a slider for send panning if you want to pan the effected signal somewhere else than in the middle. )

One more thing to notice: in most vst effects there is a button for how much dry and how much wet (effected) signal is going thru it. It’s advisable to get it as wet as possible if you use it in the aux channel. If you use it more dry you boost also the dry signal when you want to just add the amount of effect.

Good point. When used as an aux, the effect should be 100% wet, and then you blend to suit between the effect return and the original dry signal. When using effects as a channel insert, by contrast, you adjust the blend of wet/dry on the verb or whatever. Also bear in mind that as an aux, that one effect can serve multiple channels. Like one type of verb for all backup vocals for example, to give them a sense of all being in the same space together.

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Also bear in mind that as an aux, that one effect can serve multiple channels. Like one type of verb for all backup vocals for example, to give them a sense of all being in the same space together.


That is exactly what I was getting at. Thanks for your responses and advice.