Microphone Characteristics

Anyone using AKG C1000S Mic

I am currently using a AKG C1000S condenser microphone and do not have any experience with other mics. I have been told that some mics are characteristically more sensitive than others. I have been recording acoustic guitar with the C1000S and have noticed that I have to use extremely high preamp gain levels to get the signal in the correct range on my VU meters. Phantom power on my preamp is working. Could the problem be that the C1000S is not as sensitive as other condenser mics ?

This mic is not as sensitive as other condensor mics. A friend of mine uses them for live micing of choral groups and because of the low sensitivity, there is less bleed from other singers. So in this context, it is a plus.

What placement are you using?

The C1000S is on my wishlist (along with many other things of course).

I’d not read anything elsewhere about the lower gain so I’m interested to hear how this works out.


Mark

I’ve had a pair of these for a couple of years and have not noticed a particularly low output from them. Used them for recording and for live work. They are known as a good ‘general purpose’ condensor mic. Live you see them mostly on drums (overheads and a few times on snare), and only last Saturday I saw one live on the sax player.
I’ve used them to record vox and instruments. They’re OK.
Pa

I have placed the mic very close to the guitar (6") directed at the 12th fret and obtained the signal saturation that I needed. The only problem with the close placement is finger noise when changing chord positions and fingerpicking. I have also experimented with the mic at 12" to 18" but definitely noticed a significant drop in signal strength at that distance. On one occasion, I placed the mic stand behind me with the mic placed over my right shoulder and directed it down toward the guitar. That placement worked similar to the 12" to 18" distance from the guitar. I asked about the sensitivity because I personally like the sound of the guitar when I have a strong signal to the digital recorder. I am considering using 2 mics but have not purchased the second mic to date. The ADK Hamburg mic has been recommended to me and is reported to be a sensitive mic. I would like to have matching mics but I am reluctant to purchase another AKG C1000S if the mic is not sensitive to lower volumes which are characteristic of acoustic guitar. Thanks for your response to my question !

i’ve often heard of using a pair of these as drum overheads… i can see the low input being useful in that situation.

also, this is a two pattern mic… which setting are you using? one is probably more “directional” that the other. if you still have the booklet for the mic, it should explain the desired positioning/location for the mic for both patterns.

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also, this is a two pattern mic… which setting are you using? one is probably more “directional” that the other. if you still have the booklet for the mic, it should explain the desired positioning/location for the mic for both patterns.

I’d forgotten that - its done ‘mechanically’ by fitting a plastic widget over the actual mic capsule. When I bought mine, the man in the shop said ‘never fit this, its no good’. So I never did :D
arie - could it be that your C1000S has it fitted?
Pa

There are actually 2 plastic widgets for the C1000. One changes the response pattern, and the other is supposed to be a “presence boost”, designed to give a hotter output in the 3k-6k Hz range. I’ve never liked using either one, and since they do fit over the top of the capsule, either is likely to lower the output some. Seriously, the best way to get a percieved boost in a particular frequency range is to actually attenuate the frequencies you don’t want to boost.

It’s easy to take the top of the body off this mic. Unscrew it and look for a black plastic doo-dad on top of the capsule. The capsule is a dull silver finish and there is a very fine mesh screen protecting it. It is mounted on a sort of flexible rubber looking mount. If there is one of the plastic widgets installed, you should be able to gently (but firmly) remove it.

I recall this particular mic having a pretty normal output, but haven’t used one of mine in a long time. They kinda sit neglected in one of the bottom drawers of the mic cabinet…

The sensitivity of the AKG C1000 is typical for an SD condensor microphone. The AKG website lists the sensitivity as -44 dBv. For comparison, another well known SD condensor mic, the Shure SM 81, has a sensitivity of -45 dBv.

Here are a few more comparisons. As I understand it, the lower the number, the more sensitive the microphone:
Shure KMS 27 LD condensor -37 dBv
Shure Beta 58 dynamic -51.5 dBv
Shure SM 58 dynamic -54 dBv

The AKG C1000 can be battery or phantom powered from 9v - 52v. I had an AKG 451 that could be powered like that also. However, when I used battery power, the microphone was significantly less sensitive than when it was phantom powered at 48v. You didn’t say how you were powering the microphone. Perhaps the same things occurs with the C1000 as with the 451.

Thanks for your response to my questions. I have examined my mic and determined that the plastic widgets( Polar Pattern Converters) are not installed. I reviewed the recommendations for usage of the C1000S in the instructions and they listed Vocals ( lead and backing choir) and Instruments ( Brass, Woodwinds,Hi-hat, Cymbals, Snare drums/Toms). It appears that even AKG does not recommend this mic for acoustic guitar. I’ll continue to search for the right mic for my application. Thanks again for your comments and suggestions.

Quote (arie397 @ Nov. 08 2005,21:30)
Phantom power on my preamp is working.

I have a feeling it is simply a matter of mic positioning... adn knowing what to expect from a mic a pre.

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It appears that even AKG does not recommend this mic for acoustic guitar. I’ll continue to search for the right mic for my application.


But that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t work.