"Chirp" in drum track

“Chirp” in drum track

uh oh. I recorded our band at our last practice and when I got the laptop home I listened to 4 distinct “chirps” in the recording. The music is thrown forward a few beats after each “chirp”. Darn. It’s on the drum track. We use electric drums, but it’s a 10K drum kit so I’m thinking it must be my computer or a bug in the N-Track software.

Anyone get any chirps lately?

bump - what am I doing wrong?

it could be as simple as adjusting buffer sizes.


but it could other devices interfering, this happens alot on laptops.
here is a link to DPC latency checker.
this tests if there are devices that interfere with audio or video streaming.
common culprits are wireless devices, bluetooth, dvd drive even the battery.
if you find a problem the software won’t tell you what it is, you have to manually shutdown one by one until you find the issue.
there are others here that have more experience with laptops.

there are others things it could be, but checking the DPC latency first, (not the same as audio latency)

Just to add, the latency checker tools usage notes: You should see all green bars after a minute of two of testing, some yellow spikes would be considered ok, however any red spikes is a sign, devices in your systems are taking too much time and this will cause the audio or video not to stream smoothly.

Disabling the wireless lan is must. I disable mine as part of my routine on my laptop. There are systems with very low system specs able to run n-track that have posted here, however not all systems are configured the same of course. The basic rule of thumb to follow is, run as few back ground applications as possible (check to see what’s starting up with the system and disable all non essential software), use freshly defraged 7200 RPM drives if possible, use updated drivers for all your software and hardware and disable all non essential hardware in the device manager. This will go a long way to making the system stable for audio and video streaming.


PACO

Laptops have notoriously slow hard dives. I suspect that’s at the root the issue, or at least a big part of the equation.

Quote: (kishtar @ Nov. 28 2009, 8:02 PM)

uh oh.
I recorded our band at our last practice and when I got the laptop home I listened to 4 distinct "chirps" in the recording.
The music is thrown forward a few beats after each "chirp".
Darn.
It's on the drum track.
We use electric drums, but it's a 10K drum kit so I'm thinking it must be my computer or a bug in the N-Track software.


Anyone get any chirps lately?

IF you don't mind us asking, what are you using to record the "tracks" on the laptop?

I suspect it is some sort of USB interface/mixer.

Also, it has been my experience that if something is only happening on one track on not the rest that there may be an issue with that signal chain and not the rest.
Something I have noticed that has not been mentioned yet is how hot your signal may be, if this is a saturated track that would be something to look at, since if a signal is to high often it will cause a chirp since the peak of the signal cannot be converted so it just pings.
It has also been my experience when setting up sound for keyboards and electric drums with live bands that some of the signals are notoriously low, (especially when using DI's) so they need to be boosted on the soundboard with the gain, this can cause unexpected peaks and if not treated (like put through a limiter) it will clip, especially if the pads are touch sensitive (meaning the harder you hit them the louder they are).
All the suggestions so far are spot on, check and make sure your chords are shielded and all possible interfering devices are off during recording, along with using power conditioners.

keep shinin

jerm :cool:
Quote: (jeremysdemo @ Nov. 30 2009, 12:36 PM)

Quote: (kishtar @ Nov. 28 2009, 8:02 PM)

uh oh.
I recorded our band at our last practice and when I got the laptop home I listened to 4 distinct "chirps" in the recording.
The music is thrown forward a few beats after each "chirp".
Darn.
It's on the drum track.
We use electric drums, but it's a 10K drum kit so I'm thinking it must be my computer or a bug in the N-Track software.


Anyone get any chirps lately?

IF you don't mind us asking, what are you using to record the "tracks" on the laptop?

I suspect it is some sort of USB interface/mixer.

Also, it has been my experience that if something is only happening on one track on not the rest that there may be an issue with that signal chain and not the rest.
Something I have noticed that has not been mentioned yet is how hot your signal may be, if this is a saturated track that would be something to look at, since if a signal is to high often it will cause a chirp since the peak of the signal cannot be converted so it just pings.
It has also been my experience when setting up sound for keyboards and electric drums with live bands that some of the signals are notoriously low, (especially when using DI's) so they need to be boosted on the soundboard with the gain, this can cause unexpected peaks and if not treated (like put through a limiter) it will clip, especially if the pads are touch sensitive (meaning the harder you hit them the louder they are).
All the suggestions so far are spot on, check and make sure your chords are shielded and all possible interfering devices are off during recording, along with using power conditioners.

keep shinin

jerm :cool:

I'm running a USB out to a TASCAM and yes it was electric drums running just below clipping. Maybe I will turn it down? I'll also try the other suggestions on this thread. I've recorded off the laptop a few times before.
Quote: (kishtar @ Dec. 01 2009, 6:26 PM)

Quote: (jeremysdemo @ Nov. 30 2009, 12:36 PM)

Quote: (kishtar @ Nov. 28 2009, 8:02 PM)

uh oh.
I recorded our band at our last practice and when I got the laptop home I listened to 4 distinct "chirps" in the recording.
The music is thrown forward a few beats after each "chirp".
Darn.
It's on the drum track.
We use electric drums, but it's a 10K drum kit so I'm thinking it must be my computer or a bug in the N-Track software.


Anyone get any chirps lately?

IF you don't mind us asking, what are you using to record the "tracks" on the laptop?

I suspect it is some sort of USB interface/mixer.

Also, it has been my experience that if something is only happening on one track on not the rest that there may be an issue with that signal chain and not the rest.
Something I have noticed that has not been mentioned yet is how hot your signal may be, if this is a saturated track that would be something to look at, since if a signal is to high often it will cause a chirp since the peak of the signal cannot be converted so it just pings.
It has also been my experience when setting up sound for keyboards and electric drums with live bands that some of the signals are notoriously low, (especially when using DI's) so they need to be boosted on the soundboard with the gain, this can cause unexpected peaks and if not treated (like put through a limiter) it will clip, especially if the pads are touch sensitive (meaning the harder you hit them the louder they are).
All the suggestions so far are spot on, check and make sure your chords are shielded and all possible interfering devices are off during recording, along with using power conditioners.

keep shinin

jerm :cool:

I'm running a USB out to a TASCAM and yes it was electric drums running just below clipping.
Maybe I will turn it down?
I'll also try the other suggestions on this thread.
I've recorded off the laptop a few times before.

YEah try it with lower volume, you can always boost/compress the track later.
The low end is usually the culprit, although it may not show a peak it still can have a hot signal.
You say it makes the drum beat jump ahead, (or sound like it is) one way to test this is to put it against a BPM click track and see if it does jump ahead, if that is the case it would also have to bounce back or the rest of the drums will be off tempo for the song.

Also if possible see if you can get the kick drum on it's own track, if it is a 10K set that shouldn't be to hard of a feat. (maybe by panning?)

You say TAscam and USb can you possibly be more specific? there are quite a few tascam usb compatible products out there.
For instance does it have built in preamps like the M-164UF?

keep shinin

jerm :cool:

The latency checker shows mostly yellow and red when I run n-track. However, it is mostly green when I’m not running anything. I’ve disabled all devices and there is no change. Only killing n-track does the trick.

I increased the buffer size to maximum and that seemed to help slightly but I’m still getting the odd red line when I run n-track. the laptop is only 6 months old and isn’t a bottom of the barrel laptop. I’m running dual AMD processors.

Quote: (kishtar @ Dec. 01 2009, 7:12 PM)

The latency checker shows mostly yellow and red when I run n-track. However, it is mostly green when I'm not running anything. I've disabled all devices and there is no change. Only killing n-track does the trick.

I increased the buffer size to maximum and that seemed to help slightly but I'm still getting the odd red line when I run n-track. the laptop is only 6 months old and isn't a bottom of the barrel laptop. I'm running dual AMD processors.

You run the latency checker with nothing running. Don't run it with n-track. Because it checks device latency which would of course cause spikes if you run with another program like n-track. It's just a testing tool to use to test the state of an idle system. If the tool is reporting mostly green, with nothing running then your very close to getting it right. Are you adjusting latency within n-track or the Tascam? If you use the Tascam ASIO driver you must use the Tascam latency tools for recording and not n-tracks buffers.

PACO